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Pages in Issue:
52
Original Cost:
$0.10 (US)
Dimensions:
8.0w X 12.25h
Articles:
32
Recipes:
2
Advertisements:
50
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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: FRUIT, GARDEN AND HOME

Page: 3

Article

FRUIT, GARDEN AND HOME

I LIKE to visit with people. Just push back the day's work, and talk to them about the things in which we seem to have a community of interest. Sometimes the other fellow's problems and interests are more absorbing then the latest romance.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Putting Perennials to Sleep

Pages: 5, 31

Article

Putting Perennials to Sleep

WHEN the marguerites and the gaillardias are lifting their last gay flowers on self-respecting stems in the late October days, most other perennials and biennials are plainly snowing that they are ready tor their long winter sleep.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: A $75 Backyard Gem

Pages: 6, 49

Article

A $75 Backyard Gem

IT is a gem indeed, this little backyard garden, surrounded on the north and east by Lombardy poplars, on the south by a Mulberry hedge and the west by the house. Mr. John U. Loomis, Omaha, Nebraska, has created a spot of secluded and rare beauty. While he is a busy lawyer and has many other duties to perform he has yet found time for the beautifying of his home and making a finished garden in three years.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: The Planning and Decoration of Bedrooms

Pages: 7, 8, 35

Article

The Planning and Decoration of Bedrooms

Practical Suggestions You Will Find Useful

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article:

Pages: 9, 10

Article

"Pansies For Thoughts"

NOW, I'm saying Ophelia had it all wrong. In that famous "Act IV, Scene V-- Elsinore-- A Room in the Castle," where she is having her mild dementia chat with Laertes, she says: "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance; pray you, love, remember; and there is pansies, that's for thoughts," but in my opinion Ophelia was a raw hand at the garden game and did not know what she was talking about.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Origin of the Morris Chair

Page: 10

Article

Origin of the Morris Chair

I WONDER how many persons realize that the real Morris chair was designed, executed copyrighted, and put on the market by the late William Morris, socialist, poet, writer, painter, lecturer, designer and master craftsman, and that many of the so-called Morris chairs are poor imitations of the original.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Bulbs for Window or Garden

Pages: 11, 29

Article

Bulbs for Window or Garden

Suggestions To Help You Improve Your Results

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: An Adventure in Home Building

Pages: 12, 43, 47

Article

An Adventure in Home Building

WHEN Bob and Mary got married some years ago, they, like many other young couples, planned on a time when they could own a home of their own.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Make Your Own Rose Cuttings

Page: 13

Article

Make Your Own Rose Cuttings

MUCH of the charm which the gardener finds in cultivating annuals lies in the fact that there is mystery in their rapid growth and in the comparatively simple manner by which the selection can be varied and increased. The ordinary gardener of limited means grows the things he loves best for the pure joy of making two spots of beauty where but one had been previously.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Homes of Famous Americans

Pages: 14, 15, 28

Article

Homes of Famous Americans

IT is remarkable that in a world where there is so much of beauty, and happiness, and pleasure-- for the asking-- where all are occupied it only m their idleness, that we should pause now and then and demand to know whither we are going; what principles control us in our work and play; what Schemer has devised this emotion or that sweet-scented violet; this beauty of face, that ugliness of wretched penalty.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Fall Gatherings for Winter Decoration

Pages: 16, 27

Article

Fall Gatherings for Winter Decoration

BLOOMLESS winter! Dolefully we spoke of its nearness as we passed thru a field already seared with autumn yellow. Soon the little house would be blossomless. Our brightest bowls might try to be sufficient in themselves, but how unsuccessfully, and vases that we loved would lose the dignity of their use and become mere cluttering ornaments.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: How a Plan Created a Distinctive Backyard

Pages: 17, 41, 45

Article

How a Plan Created a Distinctive Backyard

Careful Planning and Persistent Work Created This Beauty Spot

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: The Heir to King Coal

Pages: 18, 24, 34

Article

The Heir to King Coal

Oil Solves Many a Problem

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: It Is Easy to Weave Baskets, Part II

Pages: 19, 20, 36, 37

Article

It Is Easy to Weave Baskets, Part II

How to Make Your Own Baskets Simply Explained

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Two Compact and Attractive Houses

Page: 22

Article

Two Compact and Attractive Houses

HOME is a magic word: to most of us it is a haven of rest and comfort, a shelter for those we love most. Whether it be just a humble little cottage or a mansion of rare beauty, home has the same meaning to me the world over.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: As I Was Saying, Burges Johnson (MacMillan), $2.50...

Page: 27

Article

As I Was Saying, Burges Johnson (MacMillan), $2.50...

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Store apples in a temperature of thirty-five degrees Fahrenheit, and this should be done as soon as possible after they are picked...

Page: 28

Article

Store apples in a temperature of thirty-five degrees Fahrenheit, and this should be done as soon as possible after they are picked...

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: NEVER HAD SUCH A GARDEN

Page: 29

Article

NEVER HAD SUCH A GARDEN

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: A Novel Backyard Garden for $50

Pages: 30, 31

Article

A Novel Backyard Garden for $50

LESS than a year ago the ground on which this attractive home is being built was an ordinary corner lot with less than the average favorable surroundings.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Strawberries may be set out if the season is not too far advanced...

Page: 31

Article

Strawberries may be set out if the season is not too far advanced...

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: He Can Do Anything With Bees

Pages: 32, 33

Article

He Can Do Anything With Bees

ONE day a swarm of bees numbering many thousands invaded a clump of shrubbery in the yard of a primary school in the Hyde Park section of Boston, Mass.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Leaves should not be burned but should be saved for use in the flower beds next summer...

Page: 33

Article

Leaves should not be burned but should be saved for use in the flower beds next summer...

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Tub Cucumbers

Page: 34

Article

Tub Cucumbers

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Geraniums should be dug up now, the earth shaken off, and hung up by their roots in a dry, cool place to hang all winter...

Page: 34

Article

Geraniums should be dug up now, the earth shaken off, and hung up by their roots in a dry, cool place to hang all winter...

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: The Proper Way to Make a Silk Lamp Shade

Pages: 38, 39

Article

The Proper Way to Make a Silk Lamp Shade

SILK lamp shades may be varied endlessly in colors combined, materials used, and wire frames selected. But the same basic rules for making one, apply to all. Therefore if we follow the steps in the making of the bridge-lamp, for instance, we shall then be able to successfully attempt any shade that meets our needs thereafter.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Garden Reminders

Page: 40

Article

Garden Reminders

LEAVES make a good fertilizer when spaded into the garden soil. They also make a good mulch and protection to rose bushes and shrubs from damage by frost.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Raising Potatoes on Vacant Lots

Page: 42

Article

Raising Potatoes on Vacant Lots

WORKING nights in an office gave me the days to myself, and I was in need of outdoor exercise. I saw vacant lots lying idle, some of them grown rank with weeds. Many were conveniently located, and were nice, soft, black dirt. These are the kind that I picked out and paid from $1 to $3 a lot annual rental.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Colorful Embroideries for the Home

Page: 44

Article

Colorful Embroideries for the Home

The woman who takes pride in her home, but who has only a limited time to spend in the making of embroideries, will welcome the designs shown in this issue. For the bedroom, no kind of embroidery is so decorative, and at the same time so easily done, as applique, while for the tea towels, French knots with outline, and lazy daisy stitches, insure attractive results with a minimum of effort.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: WILD FLOWERS IN WASHINGTON

Page: 47

Article

WILD FLOWERS IN WASHINGTON

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: The Scudders, Irving Bacheller (MacMillan), $1.50

Page: 47

Article

The Scudders, Irving Bacheller (MacMillan), $1.50

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Merry O, Ethel Hueston (Bobbs Merrill). $2

Page: 49

Article

Merry O, Ethel Hueston (Bobbs Merrill). $2

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1923 Magazine Article: Along the Garden Path

Page: 50

Article

Along the Garden Path

THE country is in safe hands. President Coolidge, aroused out of bed in the middle of the night to be informed that destiny had called him, reads the sorrowful message of his Chief's death by lamp-light. The day before, he and Mrs. Coolidge had spent in restoring an old elm tree on his father's Vermont farm. They had taken out all the decayed wood, carefully scraped and dressed the cavities and filled them with cement.

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