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52
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Articles:
29
Recipes:
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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: FRUIT, GARDEN AND HOME

Page: 3

Article

FRUIT, GARDEN AND HOME

PLEASE, may I come in? You see, I am the newest member of the Meredith clan. My name is Barbara Meredith Bohen. Since Granddaddy Meredith introduced me last month, I feel like I know everyone of you.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: A Charming Study of The Old Manse at Concord

Page: 4

Article

A Charming Study of The Old Manse at Concord

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: How Built-In Features Aid In Furnishing

Pages: 5, 6, 7

Article

How Built-In Features Aid In Furnishing

Architecture and Furnishings Can Now Be Properly Combined

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Picket Fences for the Backyard

Pages: 8, 43

Article

Picket Fences for the Backyard

LIKE the design of milady's dresses, styles in backyard enclosures change. At one time the backyard fence was distinctly out of favor, but home lovers have demanded some kind of an enclosure that will give a degree of privacy and the fence has returned to popularity. Lattice work fences, unless they are very carefully designed, are monotonous in appearance. Lately, the picket fence has come into favor. It has much to commend it.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Prairie Wildflowers for Your Garden

Pages: 9, 27, 36

Article

Prairie Wildflowers for Your Garden

Provide a Sanctuary for these Native Flowers in Your Gardens

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: How to Raise Cucumbers

Page: 10

Article

How to Raise Cucumbers

THE cucumber was probably a source of food some three thousand years ago in western Asia, where it may have originated. It found its way into China before the time of Christ and was raised in Rome before the Christian era. The cucumber must have been considered a delicacy by the old Romans who forced its growth in pits.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Are You An Electric Fan?

Pages: 11, 25

Article

Are You An Electric Fan?

I THINK it is the Society for Electrical Development that distributes a photograph showing a lady reclining near an electric fan as if she were languishing amidst shore breezes. Well, this is going to be the text of my remarks, that the electric fan can cool the home in summer and warm the home in winter. The fan is not only a draught maker; it has many other wonderful functions.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: How Cleveland Found a School Garden Program

Pages: 12, 13, 36

Article

How Cleveland Found a School Garden Program

The Results Have Met the Home Needs of a Big City

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Birds of City Lots and Gardens

Pages: 14, 37

Article

Birds of City Lots and Gardens

IN my former contribution to this subject I pointed out the fact that city lots and gardens of a certain character, especially where trees and shrubbery occurred and other conditions prevailed, may be visited by a number of kinds of wild birds, such as woodpeckers, cedar birds, and others.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Rescuing Castaway Furniture

Pages: 15, 30, 31

Article

Rescuing Castaway Furniture

How to Renew the Usefulness of Old Furniture

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Homes of Famous Americans

Pages: 16, 28, 29

Article

Homes of Famous Americans

Each month we will visit the home of a famous American. These visits will take us all over the country, and into every period of history from early Colonial days down to the present. Perhaps, in these intimate glimpses into the home-life of our great men and women, we will find even a greater appreciation for our own homes and their influence upon us.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Peaches For the Home Garden

Pages: 17, 32, 41

Article

Peaches For the Home Garden

Varieties To Grow and Methods of Home Culture

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Summer Fruits Make Winter Sweets

Pages: 18, 39

Article

Summer Fruits Make Winter Sweets

Recipes for Tempting Jams, Jellies and Marmalades

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article:

Page: 19

Article

"VERGEMERE"

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Picturesque Lines for Hillsides

Pages: 20, 33

Article

Picturesque Lines for Hillsides

HOMEBUILDERS, realty promoters, even many municipal authorities, apparently are often governed by an undeclared but very tenacious allegiance to straight lines and flat surfaces. Study almost any municipal undertaking that embraces the reclamation or conversion of naturally rolling land and you will discover the actuating motive evidently to be this very allegiance to rigid planes; causing valleys to be filled and hills to be obliterated, that the established grade may be of monotonous uniformity.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Landscape Planning Service

Page: 21

Article

Landscape Planning Service

THE problem of adjusting a house to an elevation of ground above the street is one that is often met. In the case of the house illustrated on the opposite page a solution has been worked out that gives room for a garage beneath the solarium which is a convenient arrangement.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Pattern Plays a Part in Decorating

Page: 22

Article

Pattern Plays a Part in Decorating

PERHAPS we might call it "mother's room," this lovely bedroom, where all the furniture is Early American, with incidental furnishings of the same fascinating period. Any mother who heads a busy household would surely revel in such a room-- with comfortable chairs for idle hours; a desk for correspondence; a low table for reading or sewing; and with virtually all the privacy of a separate dressing-room in the spacious alcove.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: GARDEN REMINDERS

Page: 26

Article

GARDEN REMINDERS

STAKE your tomatoes early. Set them two feet apart and three feet between rows. Nothing is gained by setting tomatoes too early. Let one shoot grow up the stake; pinch off all laterals, then pinch main shoot at top of stake. Take some of the sturdiest suckers from the plant and set them in holes six inches into the ground.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: DAD'S PRACTICAL POINTERS

Pages: 34, 35

Article

DAD'S PRACTICAL POINTERS

THIS cabinet takes the place of the old-fashioned and cumbersome tool chest which is in the way on the floor and is hard to keep in order. It is just the thing to build over one end of the workbench and while its capacity is limited it will house all the tools used on the ordinary job.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Three-Year-Old Fruit Trees

Page: 38

Article

Three-Year-Old Fruit Trees

IN the spring of 1920 I set a few fruit trees in my home garden. My friends seemed to think that it would be many years before there would be any fruit. I am going to tell you what these trees have done during their first three years.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: My Garden of Brier Fruits

Page: 38

Article

My Garden of Brier Fruits

I HAVE four kinds of small fruits in my garden which I call brier fruits. They are blackberries, black raspberries and spring and fall red raspberries. Really, there are but three kinds, for the two red raspberries are one fruit, altho the spring and fall-bearing varieties require different treatment, so I call them separate kinds.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Garden Clubs

Page: 39

Article

Garden Clubs

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Pests of the Poultry Yard

Page: 40

Article

Pests of the Poultry Yard

THOUSANDS of dollars are lost yearly to the poultry industry thru the work of the louse and the red mite. There are too many people who feel that just a few lice or a few mites won't do their birds any harm. A few on the body of the hen probably do not cause her any worry, but one must remember that they multiply rapidly.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Three Letters About Snakes

Page: 42

Article

Three Letters About Snakes

On page 78 of your March issue you give your readers an opportunity to speak "out in meetin'," as it were. You ask among other things about our hobbies-- so here goes-- you having brought this down on your own head by special invitation.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: WINNER IN ADVERTISING CONTEST

Page: 42

Article

WINNER IN ADVERTISING CONTEST

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: GARDENING FOR PLEASURE

Page: 42

Article

GARDENING FOR PLEASURE

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Music For Every Home

Pages: 44, 45, 47

Article

Music For Every Home

EVER since the birth of Christianity, men have been striving to express in musical tone the truest and best that religion means to them. Yet there is no subject in musical literature that has been more open to question.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Interesting Old Stitches Used in Smart New Ways

Page: 46

Article

Interesting Old Stitches Used in Smart New Ways

WE are showing this month designs that are especially suitable for summer porch work. The stitchery is so simple and the designs so effective that the long summer afternoons will seem to fly away and even the busiest housekeeper may have lovely pieces for home, gift, fair or bazaar before the summer is half gone.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1924 Magazine Article: Along the Garden Path

Page: 50

Article

Along the Garden Path

WELL, well, here we are again right in the middle of a lot of good things! First, it's June, the one glad season of the year; and then, right on its heels, I'm visiting with you again. There's one thing, tho, that I don't like about this garden path business-- (maybe you agree with me!)-- but it's lopsided. I do all the talking. So, you see, if you folks don't pitch in and write me about your problems and plans and hobbies, we'll never get it all evened up.

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