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Pages in Issue:
64
Original Cost:
$0.10 (US)
Dimensions:
7.875w X 12.25h
Articles:
21
Recipes:
1
Advertisements:
50
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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: The Case for Casements

Pages: 5, 6, 7

Article

The Case for Casements

Better Windows Are Now Possible for Your Home

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Our Better Camp Home

Pages: 8, 9, 58, 59

Article

Our Better Camp Home

Our Better Camp Home Success in Motor Camping is a Matter of Right Equipment

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: A Floral Paradise in Hoosierland

Pages: 10, 41

Article

A Floral Paradise in Hoosierland

IN Japan, the land of flowers, it is customary for the people to make annual pilgrimages to scenes of great natural beauty. A counterpart of this ancient oriental custom may be witnessed in the Hoosier state. On the outskirts of West Lafayette, Indiana, is located the garden of Dr. George Spitzer, a chemist on the Purdue experiment station staff by vocation, and a producer of the choicest of flowers by avocation.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Learning About the Home Garden

Pages: 11, 55

Article

Learning About the Home Garden

MY latest lessons in gardening were assimilated on our own back-yard lot-- originally heavily sodded with blue grass. I asked the previous owner why he had never tried a garden. He replied that the lot was filled in, mostly clay, and that it wouldn't grow anything. ...

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Homes of Famous Americans

Pages: 12, 44, 45, 48, 49

Article

Homes of Famous Americans

The Home of John Marshall, Expounder of the Constitution

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: How To Build An Inexpensive Sundial

Pages: 13, 57, 58

Article

How To Build An Inexpensive Sundial

You Can Make a Sundial Like This for Your Garden

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Lattices, Gates and Enclosures

Pages: 14, 15, 40, 41

Article

Lattices, Gates and Enclosures

A convenient method for lining up and leveling the column is as follows: Drive three or more posts or stakes into the ground just back of the holes for the columns, to which a strip should be nailed that has been leveled before nailing both ends with a carpenter's level. Mark off seven on the column less the distance the top of the strip is from the ground in each case.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Selection and Culture of Peonies

Pages: 16, 17, 54

Article

Selection and Culture of Peonies

PEONIES will do well in any well-drained, fairly heavy garden soil where they have not been grown before. I should not try to grow peonies, and should not advise others to do so, in a very sandy soil. Neither do they thrive in peat. The clay loams common in the northwestern states grow as good peonies as the world produces. Peonies should not be asked to compete with the roots of trees or even of shrubs, and anyone unable or unwilling to give them this freedom should plant something else.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: An Attractive Semi-Bungalow

Pages: 18, 19, 20, 25

Article

An Attractive Semi-Bungalow

THE usefulness of paper as a wall decoration is obvious and indisputable, but wallpaper as a corrective agent may be novel to many householders. Nevertheless, very sound logic underlies the use of paper to correct either the architectural or decorative shortcomings of interior walls.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Hints on Nature Study at Home

Pages: 22, 24

Article

Hints on Nature Study at Home

How Boys Can Study Nature Near the Home Place

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Bringing Color to Your Kitchen

Pages: 26, 52

Article

Bringing Color to Your Kitchen

These Combinations Will Help You Brighten Yours

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Grape Diseases

Pages: 29, 43

Article

Grape Diseases

THERE is perhaps no finer fruit grown than good grapes. Moreover, it is a fruit that adapts itself to the most limited spaces. As an arbor it makes delightful shade in summer, with a promise of many delightful moments in the autumn when the fruit ripens.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Garden Reminders

Page: 30

Article

Garden Reminders

JUNE brings its share of work as well as countless beautiful things to the home gardener. In practically all cases the main garden will be in by this time but you will still need to plant the beets, cabbage, parsnips, pumpkins and squash for next winter's use. If you have room in the garden make extra plantings of beans, corn, cucumbers, tomatoes and the like for late summer and autumn use.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: DAD'S PRACTICAL POINTERS

Pages: 34, 35

Article

DAD'S PRACTICAL POINTERS

THE dandelion war is on. Dozens of remedies have been suggested, but so far as we have been able to learn one sure way to eliminate these sturdy aliens, if not too numerous in the lawn, is to dig them up as fast as they appear. The roots are hardy and unbelievably roving, but no plant, propagating by the seed method, can long continue to exist when no seeds are allowed to mature.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Can You Make Shortcake?

Pages: 36, 53

Article

Can You Make Shortcake?

THE shortcake, in its various forms, is one of the articles of food that is perennially valued. As a "hearty" dessert it has no superior; and each spring the shortcake par excellence-- strawberry shortcake-- is hailed with the greatest enthusiasm when it first makes its appearance, and enjoyed to the last berry.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Why Not Awnings This Year?

Page: 39

Article

Why Not Awnings This Year?

AWNINGS give a cozy, luxurious air to a home that nothing else does. They lend a delightful touch of color and they are also very practical for shading windows, doors and patios, so why not awnings this year?

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Essentials in a Thrift Program

Pages: 42, 43

Article

Essentials in a Thrift Program

NEARLY every man feels inclined to throw out his chest and point to himself with pride as being a "good provider," yet how many have actually taken the time to study out just what it means to be a real provider? Not the man who can "bring home the bacon," but the man who can bring it home and keep it there is the one who qualifies.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: American Music in the Nineteenth Century

Pages: 46, 47

Article

American Music in the Nineteenth Century

Many Songs of National Importance Were Written During This Period

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Seasonable Embroideries for the Home

Pages: 50, 51

Article

Seasonable Embroideries for the Home

The pillow cases illustrated at top of opposite page are made of ordinary cotton pillow tubing, the edges being hemstitched by machine. If preferred, however, one can use linen tubing and hemstitch the hems by hand or finish the edges with a simple crochet pattern.

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: Along the Garden Path

Page: 56

Article

Along the Garden Path

I PITY only those helpless souls who do not know what it is to want to do something with their hands. I sometimes think that only those men are useless who, having hands, use them not, and having muscles never feel the divine urge or want to fashion something of their own. I don't care how you gratify that inborn desire to make something with your hands, but, in Heaven's name, gratify it!

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Better Homes & Gardens June 1925 Magazine Article: ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

Page: 62

Article

ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

ONE rainy day years ago, I spent a few minutes talking to a shoemaker, as he pegged away at his shoes. This man was a thinker and like the owls, he was far wiser than most people believed. "There is a great satisfaction," he said, "in working with your hands. You see your work before you, and peg by peg you finish it. Each piece undertaken brings its little reward when you have laid it aside, having done the best by it you know how.

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