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Pages in Issue:
52
Original Cost:
$0.10 (US)
Dimensions:
7.875w X 12.25h
Articles:
22
Recipes:
1
Advertisements:
36
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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article:

Page: 4

Article

"And Everywhere Her Seal Has Summer Set!"

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article:

Pages: 5, 6, 7

Article

"Something Old, Something New"

The Joys of Collecting and Preserving Fine Old Furniture

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: This Is Your Last Call for Narcissus

Pages: 8, 9

Article

This Is Your Last Call for Narcissus

Quarantine Regulations Prohibit Importation After This Year

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Homes of Famous Americans

Pages: 10, 11, 44, 45

Article

Homes of Famous Americans

The Birthplace and Home of Noah Webster, Lexicographer

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Fruit and Garden Diseases Common in August

Pages: 12, 13

Article

Fruit and Garden Diseases Common in August

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Hardware as a Civilizer

Pages: 14, 15, 35

Article

Hardware as a Civilizer

THERE isn't the slightest doubt that were it not for locks, hinges, butts, door checks, sash pulleys, window lifts and checks, door knobs, handles and all their other contributing anatomies, our homes would still be in the barbarous stage. Can you imagine the civilized home without doors or without windows?

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Things to Watch in Buying a Home

Pages: 16, 37

Article

Things to Watch in Buying a Home

The Heating Plant Is a Most Important Factor

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Twin Gables

Page: 17

Article

Twin Gables

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Colorful Rooms for Children

Pages: 18, 45, 47

Article

Colorful Rooms for Children

IT is all very well to grandiloquently refer to children as the great hope of the nation: but it is much more to the point to safeguard the future by providing children with an environment calculated to upbuild strength of character, keenness of mentality and appreciation of the beautiful. It is of course, primarily in the home that such a stimulating environment should exist; for the earlier years of childhood, perhaps the most formative of all, usually know little or nothing of the world beyond the home.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: How to Bud Your Garden Roses

Pages: 20, 25, 39

Article

How to Bud Your Garden Roses

You Can Bud Your Own Rose Stock With These Directions

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Canning Summer Fruits and Vegetables

Pages: 22, 27, 29

Article

Canning Summer Fruits and Vegetables

A Queen Would Envy My Rows of Shining Cans

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Radishes for Christmas Salads

Page: 24

Article

Radishes for Christmas Salads

Plan Now to Plant Some This Month

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Garden Reminders

Page: 26

Article

Garden Reminders

AUGUST is the month to plant iris. Procure your favorite named varieties from reliable dealers and plant the rhizomes in a well-drained location. By working in a little bonemeal around the roots and cultivating them you may be rewarded with blooms the first year.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Nature Lore for Youthful Readers

Pages: 28, 29

Article

Nature Lore for Youthful Readers

A DAINTY American blossom has made itself strong enough to keep a whole army at bay! It's the little fringed gentian which, when most of the other wild flowers of summer are gone, comes along with its merry flowers of blue.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Dad's Practical Pointers

Pages: 32, 33

Article

Dad's Practical Pointers

IN order to keep various tools sharp, your shop should contain a scythe stone, several files, an emery grinder and an oil stone. The oil stone will be used only on tools which require a keen cutting edge. But for the hoe, spade, and plant diggers, the emery wheel will be enough.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Better Backlot Poultry

Page: 34

Article

Better Backlot Poultry

How to Add a Few Hens to Your Yard

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Porch Comfort the Year Round

Pages: 36, 37

Article

Porch Comfort the Year Round

DURING the last decade or two, ideas and methods of home construction have undergone radical changes: Nowhere is this more apparent than when we consider the "front" porch.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Thirst Quenchers That Clink

Pages: 38, 39

Article

Thirst Quenchers That Clink

THE mere sound of chipped ice against glass is pleasing, and with the sight of the sparkling glasses one ceases to think of the scorchiness of the hot afternoon or evening.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: The Life and The Songs of Stephen Foster

Pages: 40, 41

Article

The Life and The Songs of Stephen Foster

Many of our Famous Folk Songs Were Written by This Composer

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Gay Stitchery for Bathroom and Kitchen

Pages: 42, 43

Article

Gay Stitchery for Bathroom and Kitchen

MY bathroom is the most attractive room I have. And all it cost was a little paint, a few yards of muslin and a few hours' work!

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: Along the Garden Path

Page: 46

Article

Along the Garden Path

I HAVE been reading some of Aesop's fables again. If Aesop were alive today he doubtless would write a fable about the gardener who made such a large garden that it kept him so busy doing the work it demanded that there was no time left to enjoy it. It is a good thing, I think, that most of us can't have all the ground we think we would like to have.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1925 Magazine Article: ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

Page: 50

Article

ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

MY attention has been called to a chart recently published in one of our city newspapers. This chart is based upon an investigation made by the Federal department of labor on building permits issued for the year 1924. It shows that 47 percent of home building in the principal cities was one-family houses. Apartments constituted 29.6 percent of the total; two-family houses, 19.3 percent, and dwellings combined with stores, 4.1 percent.

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