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104
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Articles:
36
Recipes:
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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: And We Draw Closer Together

Page: 3

Article

And We Draw Closer Together

FROM palm to pine, from sunlit beach to whitening peaks of Bitter Root Range, a feeling steals imperceptibly over hearts, as the nightly summer symphony dies away and keener winds come.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: An English Cottage in a Western Setting

Pages: 5, 6, 7, 32, 33

Article

An English Cottage in a Western Setting

I MET Mr. Conyers quite by accident. He was looking over a pile of lumber on a wharf. Lumber was on my mind, too, just then, so I figured we might have something in common. I was in quest of a piece of hickory.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Garden Insurance for Winter

Pages: 8, 9, 86, 87

Article

Garden Insurance for Winter

PLANTS that sleep quietly thru the winter and awaken refreshed require certain rites. Like children, when they retire they demand more or less individual treatment. Altho the more northerly localities are more susceptible to winter-killing because of low temperatures, it is not low temperature alone that takes a certain toll of plant life. And it should be remembered that plants should usually not be covered before the ground is frozen solid.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Sloving the Problems of fire Prevention

Pages: 10, 99, 100

Article

Sloving the Problems of fire Prevention

HOW little we home owners think of preventing fires! How many of us give a thought to building in a fireproof way, unless the district authorities step in and tell us how to build?

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article:

Pages: 11, 71

Article

"I've Got a Cabbage!"

IF you don't like to hoe, and if you don't hate a weed, I think you're foolish to waste your seed!" said O. M. Wilhite of Emporia,- Kansas, -unconscious of the neat couplet he was uttering. "You've got to love nature to make things grow. And it can't be just the kind of nature-love you feel when you are off on your vacation, and view some beautiful landscape. You've got to like to grub around in the soil, and to look like a tramp; you've got to feel a little twinge of grief when a plant doesn't do well.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Homes of Outstanding American Women

Pages: 12, 13, 74, 75

Article

Homes of Outstanding American Women

A NATURAL taste for working in wood has had lovely results in the slow reconstruction of our little home." Thus Dorothy Canfield Fisher, speaking mostly with reference to her husband, John R. Fisher, gives an intimation of the fascination of family, home, neighborliness and natural beauty hovering over the mountain-side near Arlington, Vermont.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Good Lamps for Good Lighting

Pages: 14, 15, 93

Article

Good Lamps for Good Lighting

BACK in the days when flickering candles and smoky lamps were the only means of lighting, rooms were large and it was very costly to light a home evenly and "well. Isolated splotches of light seemed to make the darkness still darker, and the flickering, unshaded light against the blackness was extremely hard on the eyes.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Simple Plumbing Repairs

Pages: 16, 80, 81

Article

Simple Plumbing Repairs

YOU have heard of the woman who could take a hairpin and fix anything from a clock to a washing machine. Hairpins may be out of style, but you'd be surprised to know what you can do with a piece of bent wire if the sink or lavatory begins to show a contrary disposition.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Household Pets need Intelligent care

Pages: 17, 70, 71

Article

Household Pets need Intelligent care

THE boy and his dog-- what a wealth of dear memories, association, glamor, sentiment, comes with the phrase! What visions it calls up-- visions of long hikes, romping on the lawn, fishing, prowling mysteriously thru the woods to learn the lore of the wild!

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: More Color in the Bedroom

Pages: 18, 19, 56, 57

Article

More Color in the Bedroom

THE bedroom generally is the "poor relation." among the rooms of the house, getting the cast-offs, hand-me-downs and left-overs in the way of decorative essentials and sometimes of furniture. The reason for this may be found in the opening words of a song which Alton Packard used to sing:

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: The Fast-Growing Garden Club Movement

Pages: 20, 68, 69

Article

The Fast-Growing Garden Club Movement

LET Us Spray." This is the unique motto of the garden club of Ridgewood, New Jersey, of which more later. But the club is unique in another way in that it admits only men. And thereby it accents the force of the fast-growing garden club idea in that it shows the recent astonishing interest of men in the subject of amateur gardening.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Do Plants Actually Reason?

Pages: 21, 55, 56

Article

Do Plants Actually Reason?

PLANTS that fish; plants that capture their food and cannot be deceived by substitutes; others that shrewdly adjust themselves to unusual environment; some that indulge in romance and compel their lovers to pursue them: these are but a few of the leafy creatures that have often been responsible for the query used as the title for this article.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: A Brick House That Carries Out The Unit Idea

Pages: 22, 88

Article

A Brick House That Carries Out The Unit Idea

THE small English-style house illustrated by the accompanying photograph and floor plans not only presents an exceptionally attractive outside appearance but has an uncommonly delightful interior. In fact, it is both outwardly and inwardly a house of very distinctive and altogether charming design.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Plan the landscaping When You Plan Your House

Pages: 23, 81

Article

Plan the landscaping When You Plan Your House

SIMPLICITY and unity of arrangement bring more pleasure to the small lot owner than intricacy. If the use of each particular portion of the property is plainly grasped at a glance, if these portions are carefully knit' together logically and with order like links in a chain, then the real success of the plan is achieved. That is the goal of this plan.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Nature Lore for Youthful Readers

Pages: 24, 73

Article

Nature Lore for Youthful Readers

CHILDREN who study the history of the ancient folk of the earth learn that the Egyptians were among the first, and perhaps they were the very first, users of paper for writing. They invented it from the stem of a plant called papyrus, we are told, and that is how the word "paper" came into the English language.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Under the Library Lamp

Pages: 26, 92, 93

Article

Under the Library Lamp

IN October, along with the ending of vacation, the opening of school, the ordering of coal and all the other fall activities, the women's clubs begin to buzz with anticipation and the program chairmen to wear that worried expression. "What shall our year's program be?" they ask their committees, and the committee members pucker their brows with anxiety.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Garden Reminders

Page: 28

Article

Garden Reminders

SUMMER is gone, autumn is here, This is the harvest of all the year," runs a poem that all the children love. Since this is the harvest month, the backyard gardener must first see to it that he has a place all ready to receive his precious store of fruit and vegetables. Since most basements are too warm for vegetables, many gardeners partition off a corner with wallboard, providing plenty of ventilation from outside.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Helps for The Volunteer Choir

Pages: 30, 84, 85

Article

Helps for The Volunteer Choir

TO realize the democracy of music it is necessary to remember that the music of all western civilization, whether of home, theater, concert hall or church, really had its beginning in the cathedrals and monasteries of Europe in the Middle Ages.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Getting Beauty Into the Home

Pages: 34, 89

Article

Getting Beauty Into the Home

BEAUTY is more than money deep. Real distinction in one's home does not necessarily require a large expenditure. Often the simplest and humblest of homes is more attractive than one in which expense has been of no consideration.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: The Care of Linoleum

Page: 36

Article

The Care of Linoleum

TO look its best and to wear its allotted period of time, linoleum, like everything else, must be cared for properly. The rules for taking care of linoleum, however, are very simple ones, and, as in many other phases of housework, the best way is really the easiest way when one sets into the habit.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Outwitting the Common Cold

Pages: 38, 60, 61

Article

Outwitting the Common Cold

FROM cancer and deformities of children to colds in the head may appear like going from high tragedy to low comedy in a breath. But after all it is the little things which cause the most misery, and on this basis the common cold can claim very high rating among the agencies dedicated to taking the joy out of life.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: You can Always Have

Pages: 40, 90, 91

Article

You can Always Have "Good Luck" with Your Cakes

IT is really not hard to make good cake, all pessimists to the contrary notwithstanding. To create a perfect cake is something of an art, to be sure, but an art that is not beyond attainment for any of us, provided only that some of the tricks of the trade are known and practiced.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Last-of-the-Garden Pickles

Pages: 41, 76, 77

Article

Last-of-the-Garden Pickles

A GOOD supply of really first-class pickles and relishes in one's preserve closet is a mine of wealth to the housekeeper. A platter of thinly sliced corned beef or beef loaf when accompanied by a choice piquant sauce is changed from ordinary to extraordinary; and the Saturday baked beans are an entirely different proposition if liberally dressed with a fine mustard pickle or red tomato chow-chow.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Wintering Tropical Waterlilies

Pages: 46, 67

Article

Wintering Tropical Waterlilies

IT is a popular idea that tender or tropical waterlilies cannot be wintered successfully except in a greenhouse, and hence the average pool owner must treat them as annual plants and purchase new ones each year. While this is true of many of the finest tropicals there is one family of tender day bloomers the members of which can be wintered easily without special equipment.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Wrought Iron--the Art of the Centuries

Pages: 48, 67

Article

Wrought Iron--the Art of the Centuries

SOME of the greatest art of the centuries past exists in the masterpieces wrought in iron by the skilled artisans of three and four hundred years ago. These men must have felt within themselves some sense of the strong integrity of the material in which they worked, for the character and honesty of their old masterpieces of wrought iron carry to us today a message of those days of romance and chivalry.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Home Grown Mushrooms

Pages: 50, 98

Article

Home Grown Mushrooms

CAN I grow mushrooms in my cellar, and how is it done?" This question has been asked me by a rather surprising number of people who are not content to wait for the mushroom season. Moreover they feel that home grown mushrooms are perfectly safe to use.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: STEWART HARTSHORN CO.

Page: 50

Article

STEWART HARTSHORN CO.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: For the home Craftsman

Pages: 58, 72, 73

Article

For the home Craftsman

COLONIAL wall shelves or sconces are just the things to decorate bare unbroken spaces on the walls. There is a great variety of them on the market, both the finished pieces and the unfinished pieces for home decoration, but you can easily make them yourself.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Among Ourselves

Pages: 62, 64, 65, 66

Article

Among Ourselves

I AM enclosing a photograph showing one of the interesting phases of lawn making, that is, rolling. The homemade roller was just a bit too light to pack the soil sufficiently so it was necessary to add a weight. Twenty-two pounds of babyhood was just right for the roller, and what a rare treat for the baby!

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: An Old-fashioned Garden

Pages: 78, 79

Article

An Old-fashioned Garden

FORTY-EIGHT years ago, a child, I came to the site where this particular garden is. My father wishing to retire from the farm, came to town and bought a lovely home which was to my childish mind a regular castle, as it had fourteen very large rooms, a house for the help, a conservatory, and most spacious grounds, very beautifully landscaped, which was very unusual in those days, at least in a small town.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Needlework Directions

Pages: 83, 84

Article

Needlework Directions

HERE are the scarf designs you've been inquiring about for some time-- a whole page of them!

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Along the Garden Path

Pages: 94, 95, 96

Article

Along the Garden Path

ALONG our garden path a little dog romped. Sometimes he was tied to a sort of trolley parallel to the path, because of the cantankerous city ordinances, or in more liberal seasons he scampered free in company with the Boy, or had wonderful adventures in the nooks of the garden, stalking a cottontail rabbit that mischievously and easily evaded him, or a bird that invariably flew away unharmed.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: My Poultry Plan

Page: 97

Article

My Poultry Plan

HAVING had considerable experience in poultry and having tried out various breeds, I have come to the conclusion that as an all around fowl the Rhode Island Reds head the list. They are good layers, especially in winter, when eggs are scarce and high, small eaters, and possess a frame so shaped as to plump out attractively for market purposes, and are especially nice for the table.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Saving Shoes

Page: 97

Article

Saving Shoes

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: Do You Know This Wildflower?

Page: 101

Article

Do You Know This Wildflower?

ALTHO the violet is an emblem ot modesty the gorgeous species known as the birdsfoot violet is no shrinking, timid blossom.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1927 Magazine Article: ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

Page: 102

Article

ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

TALKING across this desk or reading letters from subscribers is just like leaning in a friendly way over the fence and chatting with the neighbor next door. The variety of stimulating and encouraging things that come to the editor in this way is a constant delight.

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