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Pages in Issue:
72
Original Cost:
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Articles:
25
Recipes:
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57
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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: A Fruit of Great Cultivation

Page: 3

Article

A Fruit of Great Cultivation

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Summer Cheer in Winter Windows

Pages: 5, 6, 7, 51

Article

Summer Cheer in Winter Windows

THE modern architect, ably aided by the modern heating engineer, has practically substituted early summer's warmth for winter's cold within our homes. But while these have brought summer comfort into the house, the spirit of summer is still absent, summer's cheer and spring's promise.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: A House Made Into a Home

Pages: 8, 36, 37

Article

A House Made Into a Home

I AM writing this article for the purpose of showing what may be done in the way of making a home out of a house.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: The Return of Pewter

Pages: 9, 56

Article

The Return of Pewter

PEWTER is with us again, but it's not what it used to be. Retaining the quaint charm of the old, it has returned in a greatly improved form as to its constituent alloy.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Roses From June to October

Pages: 10, 64, 65

Article

Roses From June to October

THE ultimate object with the majority of outdoor gardeners is to obtain the greatest possible amount of bloom thruout the entire season, and this is usually accomplished by cultivating a variety of flower crops, each having its own particular season; for instance, crocuses, narcissi, tulips, iris, peonies and a variety of annuals will form successive crops of bloom thruout the summer. This system is admirable where one has plenty of garden space, but is not practicable where that space is limited.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: An Adventure in Dry-Tilled Roses

Pages: 11, 63, 64

Article

An Adventure in Dry-Tilled Roses

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Harold Bell Wright In His Garden

Pages: 12, 13, 68, 69, 70, 71

Article

Harold Bell Wright In His Garden

LAZY, he calls himself, does Harold Bell Wright, the author of eleven novels averaging a million copies each, and two other books besides. Seeing the question mark in my eyes, he points to a low table at one end of his sage-green, many-windowed studio, where stands his "lazy man's notebook."

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: The House Begins Below Ground

Pages: 14, 15, 46, 47, 48

Article

The House Begins Below Ground

A MAN asked me the other day, "What is a good house? How can an average man know the difference between poor, fair, and good houses?"

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Good Chairs--Our First Need In The Living Room

Pages: 16, 17, 57

Article

Good Chairs--Our First Need In The Living Room

EVERY man and woman has a dream living room, a more or less vague picture, in which deep, comfortable chairs, shaded lamps, the glow of an open fire, quaint footstools, books in open shelves, low tea-tables, flowers in bowls, and colorful draperies are intermingled in an interior that breathes an atmosphere of genuine comfort, old-time homelikeness and decorative charm-- a dream picture that is wholly delightful and satisfying.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Spacious But Unpretentious

Page: 18

Article

Spacious But Unpretentious

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Under the library Lamp

Pages: 22, 74, 75

Article

Under the library Lamp

NOVEMBER. Children's Book-Week. Lists of books prepared by earnest librarians to show you just what your child ought to be reading at every age and in every grade. Earnest young mothers (all mothers are young these days) seizing upon the lists with avidity, determined that Junior and Betty shall read all the books they ought to read and be just as well-equipped intellectually as the I. Q. psychologist with his rule-book and measuring-rod insists that they must be in order to meet the demands of Life.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Garden Reminders

Pages: 24, 25

Article

Garden Reminders

ARE your vegetables stored away for winter? Have you cleaned up the yard and garden? Have you put away the garden furniture and the tools, first cleaning them thoroly? Have you the materials ready for putting the garden to sleep? If not, these chores will be included in your November garden work.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: In the Homes of the Red Folk

Pages: 26, 67

Article

In the Homes of the Red Folk

SMALL boys of Indian families used to have as their toys tools of hunting and of war such as their fathers used. Every papoose had his little bow, and it was natural that he soon learned to make arrowheads for his playtime just like those of the grown-ups. Little stone axes and spades and other tools he learned to fashion in the same way, and when each son of the family grew up he was skilled in making all the tools needed for war and for hunting and for work about his wigwam home.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 29

Article

Article

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Bringing Better Music Into the Home

Page: 34

Article

Bringing Better Music Into the Home

FOLLOWING the score of symphony or opera as it comes by radio or phonograph is one of the fascinating possibilities arising out of the new "Music in the Home" era.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: For the Home Craftsman

Pages: 38, 52

Article

For the Home Craftsman

YOU will derive much more pleasure from Christmas if you make some gifts yourself. Then, too, the work of one's hands always seems so much more a personal gift than something that has been bought at the store.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Wrought Iron of Fine Design

Page: 44

Article

Wrought Iron of Fine Design

THERE is something about a wrought lantern, with its warm radiant glow thru mottled mica windows, that affords a distinctive pleasant welcome. This lantern, modeled after a purely English motif and truthfully portraying sixteenth century craftsmanship, measures twenty-four inches over all when suspended from its scroll, but it hugs the wall from which it hangs very closely, extending only eight inches from the wall.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 55

Article

Article

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: An Amateur Gardener Speaks His Mind

Pages: 58, 59

Article

An Amateur Gardener Speaks His Mind

WE amateurs want plainer language from writers on garden subjects. And, as an amateur, I am going to write about some of my experiences in plain language, hoping that some of the technical people will take the hint.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 60

Article

Article

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: How to Improve Heavy Soil

Page: 66

Article

How to Improve Heavy Soil

IT was once my problem to convert a blue clay yard into a garden. The clay was nearly the same grade as that used locally for making brick and tile. When it was dug it came up reluctantly in great chunks that the sun would bake hard in a day or two unless they were broken down promptly.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Needlework Directions

Pages: 73, 74

Article

Needlework Directions

A VARIETY of pretty articles for the home may be made from transfer design No. 270, since six attractive motifs are given on this sheet. The needlewoman who possesses ingenuity will find many interesting uses for these. Suggestions are: sash curtains, towels, runners, scarfs and pillow cases.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Ask Us Another

Page: 76

Article

Ask Us Another

QUESTIONS and answers have been quite the thing these past few months. Suppose, now, that you as readers of this magazine do the question asking and let us supply the answers. Do you want to know what books to give the children to read; what to serve at bridge club; when to set out evergreens; how to clean velour curtains, and so on? Our staff of consultants will be glad to furnish information on such home-making questions.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Tips for the Handy Man

Page: 77

Article

Tips for the Handy Man

I WOULD make a suggestion which I think will be of value to others. When having a sink, stationary tubs, or cupboards built in, have the lower edge cut back three or four inches to leave toe space. Then when you stand in front, you won't hit the woodwork and mar it or the toes of your shoes.

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Better Homes & Gardens November 1927 Magazine Article: Across the Editor's Desk

Page: 78

Article

Across the Editor's Desk

THIS issue of Better Homes and Gardens was planned with certain things in view, and we would like to hear from our readers as to what they think of the plan.

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