Become an Insider Log In

Pages in Issue:
120
Original Cost:
$0.10 (US)
Dimensions:
7.875w X 11.875h
Articles:
48
Recipes:
3
Advertisements:
79
Read This Issue
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: The Mystery in an Autumn Leaf

Page: 7

Article

The Mystery in an Autumn Leaf

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: ALONG the GARDEN PATH

Page: 8

Article

ALONG the GARDEN PATH

AUTUMN is in the air. Clouds succeed each ray of sunshine. it is the season of fulfillment. Seeds and fruits are ripening. Buds are being covered by fur coats. The wild beasts are storing food. Man is changing his summer habits. It is the time for contemplation.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: The Diary of a Plain Dirt Gardener

Pages: 10, 131, 132, 133

Article

The Diary of a Plain Dirt Gardener

OCTOBER 3. On this day I doffed overalls and hickory shirt, temporarily at least, and hied me down the eight miles of river road to the old think factory, where once again I became a university professor. But bless my soul, I was home early and out in the garden by 4 o'clock, as is my wont.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: The Creation of a Home Proportion

Pages: 13, 14, 15, 96, 98

Article

The Creation of a Home Proportion

WHAT do you consider the basis of the successful home, Mother?" my young daughter who is just making one of her own asked me. "You must have something besides recipes to pass on to me. Tell me and other young homemakers what your experience has taught you."

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: A Well-gardened Home of Old Virginia

Pages: 16, 91

Article

A Well-gardened Home of Old Virginia

THE blending of the home with the garden is an old and a basic problem. It is so well solved by the early homemakers of France and England that we come back from having seen their villages with a sense of ineffable charm. On analysis we find that this charm is created by the suitable association of house with lawn and foliage, and best of all, with flowers.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Treated in a Typical English Manner

Page: 17

Article

Treated in a Typical English Manner

IN THIS day and age of outdoor life, when the hue and cry of all modern-minded individuals is to seek the out-of-doors whenever possible, what could be more satisfying to a home owner than to possess a garden that truly reflects his knowledge of what the relation between his house and garden should be?

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: American Bulbs That Beat the Dutch

Pages: 18, 82, 85

Article

American Bulbs That Beat the Dutch

APRIL is tulip time in the Willamette Valley. Up and down from the McKenzie River to the Columbia, from the Cascade Mountains to the Coast range, tulips in their shades of red and yellow, pink and blue, bronze and purple, will majestically nod their heads.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Praiseworthy Bulbs in the Home

Pages: 19, 75, 76

Article

Praiseworthy Bulbs in the Home

DO YOU remember late last winter when you saw those lovely narcissus, hyacinths, and tulips blooming in a friend's house while the snow covered the out-of-doors? And do you recall that resolution you made to grow some in your own home next spring? The time has come when you must act if you would fulfill that wish.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: The Schoolhouse That Became a Home

Pages: 20, 21, 87

Article

The Schoolhouse That Became a Home

YEARS ago there was an unexpected holiday for the school children who took their learning in a little stone house tucked in between the hills of a very rural section of Chester County, Pennsylvania. It was one of those occasions which most country boys have dreamed pleasantly about, one of those events so often hoped for behind the arduous pages of a geography without the slightest expectation that such could ever actually happen --the schoolhouse burned down!

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: David Starr Jordan Defines Garden

Pages: 22, 23, 54

Article

David Starr Jordan Defines Garden

"Mother, I've decided on a middle name!"

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: With the Junior Garden Clubs of AMERICA

Pages: 24, 103

Article

With the Junior Garden Clubs of AMERICA

I AM WONDERING how many Junior Garden Club members still have some late flowers in their gardens. In my garden there are just a few flaming marigolds, bravely holding their tawny heads above their tarnished leaves.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: PARENTS SHOULD KNOW

Pages: 25, 58, 59, 91

Article

PARENTS SHOULD KNOW

FEW people listen patiently to another's experience, but I believe that a college teacher who has worked with college freshmen, especially, is in a unique position to formulate some general observations with respect to child rearing, and the advantage of the college teacher's point of view is obvious.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Symbols of Home and Happiness

Pages: 26, 27

Article

Symbols of Home and Happiness

WHEN we approach the habitations of mankind, our first glimpse is of dwelling-house roofs in silhouette against the sky, and the accents of this silhouette are the chimneys, with their smoke rising upward into the blue.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: There's Magic in Wallpaper

Pages: 28, 57, 58

Article

There's Magic in Wallpaper

IT IS easy enough to create a charming room if we can plan it and build it, open a bursting pocketbook and furnish it with no restrictions, and have to consider no permanent obstacles. It takes a clever woman to overcome existing faults in her room, to use old materials and make them harmonize with each other, and to do both these things without spending a fortune in the doing.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Furniture Periods That Combine

Pages: 29, 128, 129, 130, 131

Article

Furniture Periods That Combine

A HOUSE designed for the sunny days and the bright skies of the Mediterranean is likely to look ridiculous on a snow-covered New England hillside; it has, however, a comfortable sense of Tightness when its white- stucco walls are silhouetted against the brown hills and overlook the blue stretch of the Pacific; or when it is nestled in the sand and among the palms of Florida.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: The Parade of Gay-colored Lilies

Pages: 30, 31, 45, 113

Article

The Parade of Gay-colored Lilies

SCARLET lilies! Fascinating! Captivating! Who could be insensible to their compelling witchery? They are as irresistible charmers as the Pied Piper of old! We are completely under their magical spell!

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Getting Started Right With the Baby

Pages: 32, 33, 100, 117

Article

Getting Started Right With the Baby

AS I THINK back over the articles that have appeared in the magazine, it seems to me that we have rather neglected the babies. Not from intent, but because so many things about the older child seemed crowding to be said. Now, when we are talking about mental health, we simply cannot overlook the baby. The things that happen to him are the keystone of the arch, mentally even more than physically.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Putting Variety Into Meals

Pages: 34, 98, 99, 124, 125

Article

Putting Variety Into Meals

THE homemaker's cry of "What shall we have to eat today?" is as old as the ages. In spite of the fact that countless books have been written, filled with recipes to answer this question, and magazines are offering help in every month's issue, still, as useful as all this material is-- and without it what should we do?

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: A Chat About Curtains

Pages: 39, 40

Article

A Chat About Curtains

WHILE we are waiting for that home that is to be built to our taste, we must needs put up with places that are not as perfect as we would like them to be. With some few of us the trend of our lives is such that we are likely to change our residence every few years or so. But, nevertheless, there is always a way of meeting every situation and making the best of it, no matter how unattractive a house may seem.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Bringing Sunlight Into the Kitchen

Pages: 40, 41

Article

Bringing Sunlight Into the Kitchen

DO YOU have a room in your home into which too little sunlight penetrates? If so, you must arrange to get the effect of sunlight or brightness in some other way.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: New Dresses for Your Bed

Pages: 42, 44, 45

Article

New Dresses for Your Bed

WELL, why not plagiarize a little bit-- isn't love of home all bound up with love of country? And haven't the women of all time bravely carded and combed and spun and wove while their jousting spouses went galavanting off to do battle, with standards waving and lances flickering!

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Autumn Suggests Hostess Aids

Pages: 46, 48

Article

Autumn Suggests Hostess Aids

BY THE end of September, vacations and outdoor activities are largely at an end, and parties, club meetings, and informal entertaining occupy most of the social calendar. It is not so easy to find new recipes, or even new methods of preparing the familiar ones.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: WRITE US FOR OUR HELP

Page: 54

Article

WRITE US FOR OUR HELP

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: That Paper You Must Write

Pages: 60, 62, 63

Article

That Paper You Must Write

WHEN I first mapped out my book articles for the year, I named this one, rather too confidently, "When Clubs Begin to Plan."

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: A Prune, a Sailor, and a Girl

Page: 63

Article

A Prune, a Sailor, and a Girl

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Choice Shrubs for Southern California

Pages: 68, 70, 71

Article

Choice Shrubs for Southern California

WHEN a person moves from the East to California, he is bewildered by the great variety of unusual plants found in the gardens. The names are strange, and the value of each is quite unknown. Naturally, each Easterner desires a few shrubs with which he is familiar; that is, Weigelia, snowball, Flowering Almond, and mockorange, or syringa, as it is called.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Readers and Pools

Pages: 71, 109

Article

Readers and Pools

SOMETIMES we believe it will be necessary to publish a monthly supplement to Better Homes and Gardens and call it "Backyard Lily Pools," so great is the interest in these beauty spots, and so large the number of letters and photographs which we receive about them.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Billboards or Beauty

Pages: 76, 77

Article

Billboards or Beauty

"HANDSOME is as handsome does," is an adage so hoary with age that seldom do we more than smile when we hear it. But occasionally it proves itself to be as true today as it was in the days of Methuselah, or whoever the gentleman was who first used the phrase.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Built-in Wardrobes Supplant Closets

Pages: 77, 105

Article

Built-in Wardrobes Supplant Closets

BUILT-IN wardrobes are supplanting closets in modem homes. Wardrobes take only half the space usually considered necessary for closets, yet, if properly designed and fitted, they offer fully as much useful storage capacity.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Wherever You Live--Try Grapes

Pages: 78, 80, 81

Article

Wherever You Live--Try Grapes

EVERY gardener should have a hobby. Perhaps you already have one, and have experienced the keen satisfaction of raising finer delphinium or tomatoes or plums than any of your neighbors can produce. But if you have not yet concentrated your interest on any one thing, try grapes.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: California Bulb-planting Time

Pages: 85, 86

Article

California Bulb-planting Time

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Chrysanthemums in a Garden

Pages: 88, 90

Article

Chrysanthemums in a Garden

THERE is a possibility that in the near future we may have a race of Chrysanthemums that will better suit our conditions than the varieties which we have at present. It has been reported that the Department of Agriculture is devoting itself to breeding early- flowering Chrysanthemums from the best of the English sorts, and at least one of these Washington seedlings, a single dark red, has been released.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: City Services Wherever You Live

Pages: 92, 94, 95

Article

City Services Wherever You Live

BECAUSE most of us have spent years where water supply and sewage disposal is merely a matter of hooking up to municipal systems, we forget all about these essentials to modern civilization; that is, we forget these things until we find ourselves in possession of a summer camp or cottage, or what is more likely, a home beyond the incorporation limits, where there is plenty of elbow room.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: CHILD-STUDY COURSES FOR MOTHERS' CLUBS

Page: 96

Article

CHILD-STUDY COURSES FOR MOTHERS' CLUBS

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: DO YOU LIKE THE COVER PAINTING?

Page: 103

Article

DO YOU LIKE THE COVER PAINTING?

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: A Club Report

Page: 104

Article

A Club Report

MONTCLAIR is a small school, consisting of only the first four grades, but it is a unit of the very large educational system in the city of Oakland, California.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Methods of Storing Surplus Vegetables

Pages: 106, 108, 109

Article

Methods of Storing Surplus Vegetables

IT SEEMS to me that I have tried at least fifty-eight varieties of storage, some good, but mostly bad. At last, in my home, I have devised a place to keep things fresh thruout the winter.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Come to the Garden Clinic

Pages: 110, 112

Article

Come to the Garden Clinic

OCTOBER is the great bulb-planting month of the year. It is now that we can do more to secure spring garden effect than during any other one month. Bulbs, then, should be the center of interest and planted in profusion and variety.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: VALUABLE LEAFLETS

Page: 112

Article

VALUABLE LEAFLETS

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Teach Your Community Musical Expression

Pages: 114, 116, 117

Article

Teach Your Community Musical Expression

THE cultural and educational value of music as an organized community activity cannot be overestimated. For the last ten years we have been, and are now, in a period of musical reconstruction such as no country in the world has known in all its history.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Model Airplanes Your Boy Can Build

Pages: 118, 120

Article

Model Airplanes Your Boy Can Build

AS PARENTS and educators, one of our duties is to keep our boys busy. The boy with a full program has little time, and even less incentive, to get into trouble. Right here is where the home workshop may serve by furnishing interesting and worthwhile entertainment for him.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Tips for the Handy Man

Pages: 120, 121

Article

Tips for the Handy Man

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: When the Pear Limbs Die

Page: 121

Article

When the Pear Limbs Die

IF THE tips of branches on that favorite pear tree in the back yard have given indications of dying during the summer, do not neglect to take action this fall. Your tree probably has fire -blight, a destructive disease that is likely to ruin it in one or two seasons unless drastic action is taken.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: A Pergola of Small Price

Page: 122

Article

A Pergola of Small Price

MY PERGOLA did not have its inception in an hour spent with some intriguing garden-accessory catalog. It was not the result of a desire to beautify the landscape about our home or form a feature of a garden vista. It was born of strict necessity.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: Landscape Tips for Texas Gardeners

Page: 123

Article

Landscape Tips for Texas Gardeners

PERHAPS I can offer a few suggestions that will help those that are anxious to plan and plant their grounds and arc not able to pay the usual price for professional plans.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: The Children's Pleasure Chest

Pages: 126, 127, 128

Article

The Children's Pleasure Chest

DEAR Boys and Girls: All the letters and stories that you send to me are so interesting! I'm always so happy to hear from you, because you have so many fine things to tell me about. Just keep it up. Whenever we can use a letter or story in the magazine, the writer receives a check for $2, just as Roberta and Doris and Mary Frances, whose stories appear in this issue, did.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: The Legend of the Lucretia Dewberry

Page: 133

Article

The Legend of the Lucretia Dewberry

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens October 1929 Magazine Article: ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

Page: 134

Article

ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

MY VACATION wanderings took me thru the city of Huntington, Indiana, where a noteworthy thing has been done by the community builders.

Read Article
Cover
Page: 2 - 3
Page: 4 - 7
Page: 8 - 9
Page: 10 - 13
Page: 14 - 15
Page: 16 - 17
Page: 18 - 19
Page: 20 - 21
Page: 22 - 23
Page: 24 - 25
Page: 26 - 27
Page: 28 - 29
Page: 30 - 31
Page: 32 - 33
Page: 34 - 35
Page: 36 - 39
Page: 40 - 41
Page: 42 - 43
Page: 44 - 45
Page: 46 - 47
Page: 48 - 49
Page: 50 - 51
Page: 52 - 53
Page: 54 - 57
Page: 58 - 59
Page: 60 - 61
Page: 62 - 63
Page: 64 - 65
Page: 66 - 67
Page: 68 - 69
Page: 70 - 71
Page: 72 - 75
Page: 76 - 77
Page: 78 - 79
Page: 80 - 81
Page: 82 - 85
Page: 86 - 87
Page: 88 - 89
Page: 90 - 91
Page: 92 - 93
Page: 94 - 95
Page: 96 - 97
Page: 98 - 99
Page: 100 - 103
Page: 104 - 105
Page: 106 - 107
Page: 108 - 109
Page: 110 - 111
Page: 112 - 113
Page: 114 - 115
Page: 116 - 117
Page: 118 - 119
Page: 120 - 121
Page: 122 - 123
Page: 124 - 125
Page: 126 - 127
Page: 128 - 129
Page: 130 - 131
Page: 132 - 133
Page: 134

View the next article from your search or return to your search results.

view the complete issue