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59
Recipes:
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104
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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Garden Law

Page: 7

Article

Garden Law

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Along the Garden Path

Page: 8

Article

Along the Garden Path

APRIL is the joyous month of growth and expectation. We an-ticipate leaf and blossom. We are conscious of the life in every thing, of the desire to burst its bonds and escape.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: The Diary of a Plain Dirt Gardener

Pages: 10, 138, 140

Article

The Diary of a Plain Dirt Gardener

APRIL 2-- This afternoon I uncovered the peonies and tulips in front of the long shrub border. (There has been a great temptation to do it sooner.) Some of both were peeping above the ground. Then I worked away, resetting more of the perennials that had been disturbed by the winter's heaving. I also reset some of the rambler roses on the west border fence that had been planted last fall and were partially out of the ground, despite all my heaped dirt and mulching.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Your Dream Home Brought Down to Earth

Pages: 13, 14, 15, 102, 104

Article

Your Dream Home Brought Down to Earth

WHEN we should live together in a cozy little spot Hid in a nest of roses, with a fairy garden spot.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Acquaint Yourself With These Annuals

Pages: 16, 114

Article

Acquaint Yourself With These Annuals

ANNUALS have their place in the garden. Who can l say that they are of less importance than the perennials? They bloom from day to day until the killing frosts of fall. Their variety is almost limitless, yet but few annuals are commonly cultivated.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: The Lazy Man's Garden

Pages: 17, 130, 132

Article

The Lazy Man's Garden

NEARLY everyone, at some period of his life, has dreamed of sometime having a garden. Few who indulge in the dream actually wish to assume the care which the average garden demands, however.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: What a Man Wants in His Home

Pages: 18, 19, 129, 155

Article

What a Man Wants in His Home

MEN have had almost everything to say about the designing and the building of the American house, and it has been almost entirely wrong according to the women. Women have had almost every-thing to say about the decoration and the furnishing of this house, and it has been almost entirely wrong according to the men. May we therefore assume that between the two of them the great American home has been almost entirely wrong?

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Mrs. Hoover--Homemaker and World Citizen

Pages: 20, 64, 65

Article

Mrs. Hoover--Homemaker and World Citizen

"RICH man, poor man, beggar man, thief; doctor, lawyer, merchant, chief!" gayly chanted a blue-eyed girl in Iowa some years ago. But the buttons on her frock steadfastly refused to reveal the secret, for how could a childish rhyme disclose a future First Lady?

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Quaint Beauty in Old-Time Gardens

Pages: 21, 132, 133, 141

Article

Quaint Beauty in Old-Time Gardens

AN OLD-FASHIONED garden! The words call to mind some of the famous old gardens laid out in colonial days: the Shirley and Westover and other Virginia gardens on the James or the Shenandoah, with quaint parterres and crepemyrtle, and boxwood hedges behind which the Sleeping Beauty might have lain undisturbed a hundred years; the gardens around Charleston and farther south, sheltered by live oaks hung with Spanish-moss, perfumed with jasmine and garlanded with Cherokee roses; or perhaps the prim New England gardens, with stately hollyhocks against a clean white picket fence; or a Pennsylvania Dutch garden, with tulips in carefully designed beds and wistaria hanging over a stone well-house

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: George Matthew Adams in His Garden

Pages: 22, 23, 100, 101

Article

George Matthew Adams in His Garden

GEORGE MATTHEW ADAMS, besides being an able writer, is one of the most successful men in the newspaper-syndicate business. He employs scores of people and can be seen in his luxurious offices at 250 Park avenue, New York City-- a human, "regular" fellow-- no long hair or non-masculine idiosyncrasies, but a virile, wiry, hardworking business man in a difficult city. in a most competitive era.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Study Your Garden Soil

Pages: 24, 153, 154

Article

Study Your Garden Soil

IF a building of any size is to be erected in a comparatively short time, there must be on hand the materials out of which it is built. They need not all be on the ground when the foundation is laid, but they must be there as they are needed or the work slows down. So it is with plants.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article:

Pages: 25, 123

Article

"Books in Running Brooks"

IF THE eight-hour day is to become the six-hour day, what are future citizens going to do with their time? Here is how one American school is trying to answer the question. Why may not thousands in the days ahead learn the fun of working with the rest of the Kingdom of Life?

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: ADVENTURES IN SUMMER OUTINGS

Pages: 26, 27

Article

ADVENTURES IN SUMMER OUTINGS

THERE is no telling, of course, just when the first thrill of spring restlessness is going to hit one. The first hint of warmth in the sunshine, the first robin flashing across the soft blue of the sky, the first fragrant tang of bonfire smoke drifting thru the clear, thin air of twilight as we trudge homeward some evening, and suddenly we are dreaming of distant places, of sunshine on grass, the cool shadows of trees, the lapping of waves on a sandy beach.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Ground Covers Add Grace to Every Garden

Pages: 28, 146, 147

Article

Ground Covers Add Grace to Every Garden

MASSES of low-growing plants are being used more and more in gardens these days. As coverings for banks and terraces, as edgings for pools and perennial borders, and as a substitute for grass under trees and in dense shade, these creeping plants, or ground covers, have a definite place in every garden.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Teaching Children Conservation

Pages: 29, 82, 83

Article

Teaching Children Conservation

WHO will teach the children what conservation means? They are the ones who really count, and if they are not reached, all is wasted effort. Surely it is too much to ask school teachers to shoulder a new burden. With health drills and character building and good citizenship ideals, not to mention the still useful three R's, they have more than enough to do.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Good News About Radio

Pages: 30, 150, 151, 152

Article

Good News About Radio

TODAY'S receiving equipment is so satisfactory that whatever is purchased now will be sure to be serviceable for a long period. This is the good news in the radio world today. So why miss the highly entertaining and instructive programs that are being broadcast?

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: What the Bureau Of Standards Is Doing for the Home Builder

Pages: 31, 124, 127, 128

Article

What the Bureau Of Standards Is Doing for the Home Builder

WE WANTED a house. Now when that particular want gets hold of you, it digs in, entrenches itself, and grows and grows. It got so that nothing seemed to us quite so important as having our own roof over our heads, our own cozy fireplace, our own personal and private windows to look out on the passing world.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Plant Hedges for Beauty

Pages: 34, 118, 119

Article

Plant Hedges for Beauty

IF YOU wish to mark the boundary line of a lawn or garden in a delightful fashion, why not plant a hedge? Such a wall of living green affords a charming background for flowers and plants, takes up but little space, and suggests an air of refinement and inoffensive seclusion.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Spring Magic in Paint

Pages: 35, 50, 51

Article

Spring Magic in Paint

RECENT innovations in the field of interior decoration are too extensive to be covered in a single article. For this reason, I shall confine myself to a single phase of it, that of home painting and finishing.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Blending the Old With the New

Pages: 36, 37, 148, 150

Article

Blending the Old With the New

THIS is a story of the remodeling of a house in which success rewarded the efforts far beyond the anticipation of the owners, and in which the house taught them a new and more interesting way to live. To begin at the beginning, a family that had always lived in Chicago, but had owned a tract some 20 miles from town, on which they had had picnics and enjoyed the pleasures of the country in summer, conceived the idea of building there and making the country their year-round home.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: And Now, What Makes Children Nervous?

Pages: 38, 112

Article

And Now, What Makes Children Nervous?

ASA CHILD, Richard was the pride of his parents' hearts. Precocious and with no discernible inhibitions, he talked readily and impressively to everyone from the time he was 1 year old. At 3 he spoke pieces at the Sunday-school entertainments. At 5 no community social event was a success without him. At 8 he made public speeches and covered himself and his parents with glory.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: These Are Mothers' Methods

Pages: 39, 116, 118

Article

These Are Mothers' Methods

FIFTEEN or twenty years from now my daughters-in-law are going to rise up and call me blessed, because I am training my two sons as self-sufficient human beings instead of members of the pampered sex.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Thrifty Meal Planning

Pages: 40, 155, 156

Article

Thrifty Meal Planning

WITH particular interest I read Mrs. Twichell's "Banking Money in the Kitchen" in Better Homes and Gardens last year, and I found in it many useful and helpful suggestions because I have eight to feed on less than $50 a month.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Waterless Cookers

Pages: 42, 70, 83

Article

Waterless Cookers

IF POT watching does not fascinate you, waterless cooking will. Foodstuffs prepared in this manner require a minimum of attention and oven space, and they retain maximum amounts of their food value and natural flavor.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Introducing Gingham Dog and Calico Cat

Pages: 48, 50

Article

Introducing Gingham Dog and Calico Cat

SOME children born with that silver spoon of tradition in their mouths have day nurseries and night nurseries; some fall heir to great treasures in the attic under the parental roof. Others have a sunny room or wee alcove for their very own, while still others possess but a toy-box.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Ice Refrigeration the Year Round

Pages: 52, 80

Article

Ice Refrigeration the Year Round

HOUSEHOLD refrigeration the year round is now a recognized necessity because we have awakened to its tremendous contribution to health and general well-being. However, to be really efficient and economical, the refrigerator must be chosen with considerable care and intelligence, particularly as regards construction.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: My Bristling Servants

Pages: 55, 56, 57

Article

My Bristling Servants

THE homemaker of yesterday was limited to such cleaning tools as turkey and chicken wings and handmade brooms. The homemaker of today has at her command a large variety of time-saving, step-saving, and energy-saving brushes. Industry and the modern home- maker are largely responsible for this revolution in household-cleaning processes and this array of "bristling servants."

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Correct Pruning of Berries Is Simple

Page: 57

Article

Correct Pruning of Berries Is Simple

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Modern Laundries Banish

Pages: 58, 60

Article

Modern Laundries Banish "Wash Day Blues"

"VISITORS welcomed," I read in the advertisement of a local laundry. Since there are undoubtedly laundries in your locality extending this same invitation, I want to give you some inkling of the interest there is in store for you if you act on the suggestion, as I did, and make the trip.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Growing Celery in Semiarid Regions

Pages: 60, 61

Article

Growing Celery in Semiarid Regions

CELERY, as all gardeners are aware, requires a good deal of water and is really successful only where rainfall is regular and adequate. Frequent watering, where rainfall is insufficient, often achieves fair results, but most lovers of celery become weary of the work involved and erase this choice vegetable from their garden list.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Aids to Better Housekeeping

Pages: 62, 64

Article

Aids to Better Housekeeping

AT LEAST once a year most of us are conscious of shabbiness in our kitchens, and we feel that something new is needed L if we are to continue to take pride in doing work there. It is the natural reaction of spring, is it not? Newness everywhere makes us look at our kitchens in a new light. And if they don't measure up, what then? Obviously, we cannot discard them like last year's hats, but we can have some new things to put in them, things that will renew our joy in kitchen work.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: With a Dash of Chili

Pages: 66, 68, 69

Article

With a Dash of Chili

THE intriguing secret of Mexican cookery is the seasoning. Wherever found, Latins may be known by their highly flavored sauces, whether these are the marvelous concoctions of crab a la Creole or spaghetti Italienne. Mexican dishes are distinctive for that inevitable dash of chili.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Count Your Plants

Pages: 73, 74

Article

Count Your Plants

IS YOUR home as completely landscaped as the average well-planted home in the United States?

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Gardening in Florida

Pages: 74, 75

Article

Gardening in Florida

THE native-born Floridan knows just what to plant in his flower garden for winter and spring blooms, and when the heat of summer comes, he also knows what will withstand the sun's hot rays, but an adopted Floridan, who comes here for the first winter, is charmed by his surroundings.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Harden Your Plants, Then Transplant

Page: 75

Article

Harden Your Plants, Then Transplant

PLANTS, like animals, are sensitive to sudden changes in environment. Experienced commercial growers know this, and just before transplanting to the field seedlings started under glass in the late winter, they put them thru a process of hardening. This is done by gradually subjecting the tender plants to the temperature and moisture conditions they will meet in the field.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Are Books a Part of Your Home?

Pages: 76, 78, 79

Article

Are Books a Part of Your Home?

IN "THAT Aprille" when, as a preliminary to May house-cleaning, we take stock of our home surroundings and lay plans for the necessary repairs, why not check up on our mental and spiritual equipment also? The influence of books and other reading-matter may be a bit more difficult to compute than the influence of the foods we serve our families, but I can assure you that it is quite as worthy of consideration.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Jack Frost's Favorite Vegetables

Pages: 84, 86, 87

Article

Jack Frost's Favorite Vegetables

IF WE have planned and planted our garden according to suggestions given in previous articles, particularly according to the schedule given in the December issue, we now nave good stands of the hardy crops sown in March and April-- peas, beets, onions, parsnips, salsify, and the rest.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Perennials in the South

Page: 87

Article

Perennials in the South

THE long, hot, and dry summers in the South are severe for perennials, and for several years all my efforts to grow them were a complete failure. I sowed the seed as the direc-tions advised me to do-- in the fall. Very few of them germinated, and those that did, did not live.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Nature Protects Her Own

Pages: 88, 97

Article

Nature Protects Her Own

"CAMOUFLAGE" has become a popular word with us since the World war. Mother Nature, however, has practiced the art with her feathered children since the dawn of creation.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Common Sense in the Hardy Garden

Pages: 91, 92, 93

Article

Common Sense in the Hardy Garden

THERE are two kinds of hardy gardens the well-remembered, colorful and flowery garden, and the starved graveyard of garden hopes. The picture of the luxuriant, gorgeous, hardy garden glimpsed thru the fence of some private estate will live in your mind for years. Nothing can equal it in color or beauty, and it is a sight that will make any home owner wish to have its equal in his own back yard.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Witloof Chicory fo Winter Salads

Pages: 94, 96

Article

Witloof Chicory fo Winter Salads

IN OUR choice of winter salad greens, we used to go from head lettuce to cabbage to celery and then reversed the order by using celery, cabbage, and lettuce with. whatever else could be found to pad out the salad, and round and round we moved. We still, of course, move in rotation, but of late one other spoke has been added to the wheel and that extra spoke is Witloof chicory or French endive.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Beautifying the Trash Vile

Page: 104

Article

Beautifying the Trash Vile

THE trash pile is inevitable. It is the catch-all for the rubbish of the yard and house; it is the thorn in the side of many a homemaker. In spite of our most careful planning and care, rubbish will collect. We must have a place for such debris, and usually that place is unsightly.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: kitchen System

Page: 105

Article

kitchen System

EVERYTHING in its place, and a place for everything, is the ideal of every methodical woman, but with several persons helping around a kitchen it is difficult, if not impossible, to maintain this ideal. The bread-knife will get in the drawer with the kitchen tools, the paring-knife with the small utensils. the kitchen spoons among the silver.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Pot Herbs for All Gardens

Pages: 106, 111

Article

Pot Herbs for All Gardens

ALTHO flavoring herbs are used quite often by the good homemaker when preparing the most palatable dishes for the family, nevertheless, very few home gardens contain an area devoted to the growth of these "palate satisfiers." They not only require a very small space, but if properly grouped, they also add a peculiar variety and charm to the kitchen garden.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: The First American Home

Pages: 109, 110

Article

The First American Home

A WOMAN constructed the first dwelling in the United States. It was a tent of skins stitched together with sinew and waterproofed at the seams with buffalo tallow. A splinter of bone served as a needle. The woman's husband, using a sharpened stone, cut lodge poles, which he dragged to the home site.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Avoiding Leaks in Pools

Page: 114

Article

Avoiding Leaks in Pools

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: THE GARDEN CLINIC

Pages: 120, 122

Article

THE GARDEN CLINIC

APRIL is one of the most fascinating months of the year. In the North, it is the month of expectations-- in the South, the month of fulfillment. In the North each day we hope and expect some other plant will show signs of life or blooming, for even in severe climates, we may have bloom in our gardens if we have planned wisely.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: A Seed Discovery

Page: 128

Article

A Seed Discovery

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Tool craft Projects for Spring

Pages: 134, 136, 137

Article

Tool craft Projects for Spring

NEARLY every home workshop enthusiast has made garden sticks, usually of wood sawed out by hand or machine, but few have tried to cast garden sticks of metal. The patterns may be taken to the foundry and cast of iron or other metal, but it is very interesting to cast them at home, using scrap lead, which can be melted over any flame. Boys enjoy making the castings as much as dad ever enjoyed casting lead soldiers and bullets.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: THREE NEW LEAFLETS ON HOME HANDICRAFT

Page: 137

Article

THREE NEW LEAFLETS ON HOME HANDICRAFT

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Tips for the Handy Man

Page: 137

Article

Tips for the Handy Man

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 139

Article

Article

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: The Children's Pleasure Chest

Pages: 142, 145

Article

The Children's Pleasure Chest

HERE is a surprise for all the boys and girls who read The Children's Pleasure Chest. It's a contest about birds! Read directions carefully.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Favorite Feathered Friends

Page: 144

Article

Favorite Feathered Friends

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: My Cheerful Kitchen

Page: 147

Article

My Cheerful Kitchen

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 148

Article

Article

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 154

Article

Article

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 156

Article

Article

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1929 Magazine Article: ACROSS The EDITOR'S DESK

Page: 158

Article

ACROSS The EDITOR'S DESK

THIS issue is the largest in the history of Better Homes and Gardens. And yet there are so many things that we wanted to crowd into it that we felt as tho we could have filled an issue twice this large. Subjects are lined up in an eager row, anxious to be recognized. The year has started out very favorably, and we can promise many more fine things in the coming numbers.

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