Become an Insider Log In

Pages in Issue:
86
Original Cost:
$0.10 (US)
Dimensions:
7.625w X 11.875h
Articles:
30
Recipes:
3
Advertisements:
62
Read This Issue
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: WHO pays for Advertising?

Page: 7

Article

WHO pays for Advertising?

ONE good way to get something for nothing is to take advantage of the money saved by large-scale production.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: Along the Garden Path

Page: 8

Article

Along the Garden Path

SUMMER drouth was severe. Many a gardener wondered if it would ever end. He thought that gardening was hazardous. Then came the rains and cooler weather. Immediately his spirits rose. He began again to plan for gardens, for the green came back to the lawns, the parched plants again blossomed.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: The Roving Gardener

Pages: 10, 68

Article

The Roving Gardener

NOW comes the time of year when Jack Frost is completing his big job of landscaping. We see the trees and shrubs all turned to myriad glorious patterns not unlike those of oriental rugs and soft silks.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: The Kitchen Has Had Its Face Lifted!

Pages: 13, 14, 55

Article

The Kitchen Has Had Its Face Lifted!

FORTY years ago a kitchen like the Lowells' would have been a sensation. One can imagine members of the local Kensington Circle discussing it in awed tones while needles flew back and forth over embroidery.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: Gardening on a Shoestring

Pages: 15, 66, 67

Article

Gardening on a Shoestring

IT IS common enough to read of a garden built on clay or rocks or even on paper, but this is the tale of a garden built on a shoestring! A shoestring of money-- and of time, too.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: A Home With a Livable Atmosphere

Pages: 16, 17

Article

A Home With a Livable Atmosphere

THE really livable test of the essential qualities of your home comes when, on looking at it in the finished state of furnishing, you see whether or not you have achieved a comfortable, homelike atmosphere. It is not always easy for many homemakers to do this, for they are so often bound by rules and regulations as to what is correct and what is not. The most perfect home atmosphere is achieved by disregarding rules at the finish and giving the house the air of being used and, shall we say, abused in a gentle manner.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: A House That Grew in California

Pages: 18, 84

Article

A House That Grew in California

WHEN the much discussed question of whether to buy or to build a home has finally been settled in favor of building, the further questions of location and size immediately present themselves, and they prove very difficult of decision in the present day of varying living conditions.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: A House That Looks at the Garden

Page: 19

Article

A House That Looks at the Garden

NOT long ago the front porch was almost as essential a part of the house as the chimney or roof. On summer evenings the members of the family would group themselves with porch chairs and hammock and watch the town go lazily by. The squire and his buggy, drawn by a dashing pair, would pass by, while less fortunate folk of the community went for an evening stroll along the sidewalks.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: A Landscape Architect Discusses Gardens

Pages: 20, 70, 71

Article

A Landscape Architect Discusses Gardens

GARDENS have induced romance, changed history, inspired poems. Sentiment is synonymous with rose-covered trellises and cobbled walks.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: Fencing Those Lively Heat Units In or Out

Pages: 21, 56, 57

Article

Fencing Those Lively Heat Units In or Out

INSULATING materials in the greatest number are in stiff and rigid boards formed by the matting of ground or shredded vegetable fiber. These boards are in different degrees of firmness thru differing qualities of their fibers, which may be of various kinds of wood, of cane, of straw, or of other growths.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: The Meiers Rebuild a 70-Year-Old House

Pages: 23, 82, 83

Article

The Meiers Rebuild a 70-Year-Old House

ROUND the corner, down a quiet little side street, in Monroe, Michigan, stands this house, smiling in the morning sunshine, but partially shaded by the magnificent trees in front. Its informal treatment is so unique that it has caused many to stop to study its fine details.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: Home Habits Among the Animals

Pages: 25, 61, 62

Article

Home Habits Among the Animals

YOU have probably heard of the gingerbread house and the cottage with its walls of sugar plums; but do you also know about the little American animal that builds its winter home out of the food that it likes to eat?

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: Color Schemes for Your Kitchen

Page: 26

Article

Color Schemes for Your Kitchen

TO SECURE authentic information about color schemes for the kitchen, I recently dropped in to chat with a woman who has had a great deal to do with color-styling household equipment. "How," I asked Mrs. Hazel Adler, of the Taylor System of Color Harmony, "can American women learn to use color advantageously in their kitchens?"

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: The Bicycle Club Makes Christmas Gifts

Pages: 27, 65, 69

Article

The Bicycle Club Makes Christmas Gifts

THERE was a rustling of tissue paper and many a giggle as the girls of the Bicycle Club filed into Thelma's the afternoon of the second Saturday in November. This was an important meeting, oh very important, for we were not going to give our time over to fun entirely but were, instead, going to use this afternoon in making Christmas presents.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: Botany Prints for Home and Giving

Page: 28

Article

Botany Prints for Home and Giving

OUR tastes in art and decoration swing pendulumlike from generation to generation, but, in retrospect, we find that the formal, the decorative, and the inspirational treasures endure and re-occur.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: What's the Matter With Mary Jane?

Page: 29

Article

What's the Matter With Mary Jane?

I MET the mother of Mary Jane. She backed me into a convenient corner and poured out her woes: "I can't think what has come over Mary Jane! She has grown so cross and impudent. I don't suppose I've had a decent word from her in a month. She flies off the handle at the least little thing and has regular temper tantrums.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: A Garden on High Sea Cliffs

Pages: 30, 83

Article

A Garden on High Sea Cliffs

A GARDEN of extraordinary beauty flourishes above the seal rocks near San Francisco in defiance of mighty elemental blasts from the western sea. Despite the relentless winds that at times have threatened to dislodge the Sedums from their moorings in the rocks and the stout windbreaks from the soil, the garden bore away the palm from all entrants in a recent amateur garden contest.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: Rejuvenating the Shabby Bathroom

Pages: 31, 73, 74

Article

Rejuvenating the Shabby Bathroom

THERE is magic in the power of color to take away the "down at the heels" look and make a room smile again. A bathroom may be as colorful as an old-fashioned flower garden and still be both practical and in perfect harmony with itself and its surroundings. Taste and ingeniousness have been known to work wonders.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: Is Your Home Furnished as It Should Be?

Pages: 35, 77, 78

Article

Is Your Home Furnished as It Should Be?

YOUR ideas about furniture for a living-room and my ideas about that same room are probably utterly unlike. But you may have your home furnished in the most modernistic of fashions, and I may keep my great-grand-mother's Heppelwhite, and both of us be right, if we take Dorothy Dix's word for it.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: The Old Rose Man of Las Vegas

Pages: 36, 62, 63

Article

The Old Rose Man of Las Vegas

A YOUNGER son in England in the last century, as for centuries before, was somewhat of a vermiform appendix-- unnecessary from the standpoint of succession, a potential source of trouble, and up to manhood an expense. But in the course of human events, these younger sons came to earth, they grew, generally they thrived as well as their elders.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: A California Amateur Experiments

Pages: 40, 76

Article

A California Amateur Experiments

SOME of us like to experiment, others like to remember places and friends by bringing home living souvenirs for our friendship gardens. And all of us who garden for the love of it are fond of passing on bits of our gardens to others in the form of slips and started shrublets.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: November Notes From a Gardener's Scrapbook

Pages: 42, 89, 90

Article

November Notes From a Gardener's Scrapbook

CHEMICAL weed killers, tho far from perfection, are very effective except for dandelions. If you have a lawn that is so full of weeds that hand digging is hopeless and even heavy fertilization merely stimulates the weeds to exclusion of the grass, then chemicals may be used to advantage.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: Make Your Own Cards

Pages: 45, 58, 59

Article

Make Your Own Cards

THE average person would enjoy sending beautiful, individual Christmas cards to his friends, but the cost, which may be from 50 cents to $3, limits this practice to comparatively few people. However, with equipment found in the average home and a small amount of ink, you can devote your spare time to making your own greeting cards.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: We Visit a Southern Bird Garden

Pages: 46, 72

Article

We Visit a Southern Bird Garden

AS I LOOK at the picture above I can hear our Junior Gardeners of the North saying:

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 48

Article

Article

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: Homemaking Study Clubs

Page: 50

Article

Homemaking Study Clubs

EMILY NEWELL BLAIR, writing in the May issue of Better Homes and Gardens, did a bit of personal reminiscing that interested me very much. Said she:

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: WHEN A WOMAN SHOPS

Page: 54

Article

WHEN A WOMAN SHOPS

THERE is a new, real wood wall covering as pliable as canvas. Made by a special process, it bends readily for even the corners of a room. This covering comes in large sheets or rolls and is offered in walnut, oak, and mahogany. The material is priced moderately and will doubtless appeal to those who would not otherwise be interested in an entire wood room.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: The Children's Pleasure Chest

Page: 80

Article

The Children's Pleasure Chest

BYE and bye it came to be Thanksgiving Day by the calendar on the wall. Piggsy, Wiggsy, and Wag, the three pink pigs, had eaten a hearty dinner of cabbages and now lay on fresh clover mattresses in the sunroom.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article:

Page: 81

Article

"Land of the Pilgrims' Pride"

WHEN we appreciate something we like to fix it up at its very best, then display it to our friends and enjoy it with them. This is exactly why a great feast is the symbol of Thanksgiving. This, as you know, is the harvest holiday, when, for over three hundred years, Americans have displayed how grateful they are for a wonderful homeland by assembling fine turkeys, and pumpkins, and other foodstuffs of its bounteous harvest for a Thanksgiving dinner.

Read Article
Better Homes & Gardens November 1930 Magazine Article: ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

Page: 92

Article

ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

ARE we all living so feverishly today that we have lost the line family life that once cast a kindly glow over the home? We do not think so. However, there are those who profess the belief that the old tranquil evenings of companionship, the quiet, unhurried meal together, the hours spent in family games, conversation, reading, fun-making, have gone forever.

Read Article
Cover
Page: 2 - 3
Page: 4 - 7
Page: 8 - 9
Page: 10 - 13
Page: 14 - 15
Page: 16 - 17
Page: 18 - 19
Page: 20 - 21
Page: 22 - 23
Page: 24 - 25
Page: 26 - 27
Page: 28 - 29
Page: 30 - 31
Page: 32 - 33
Page: 34 - 35
Page: 36 - 37
Page: 38 - 39
Page: 40 - 41
Page: 42 - 45
Page: 46 - 47
Page: 48 - 49
Page: 50 - 51
Page: 52 - 53
Page: 54 - 55
Page: 56 - 57
Page: 58 - 59
Page: 60 - 61
Page: 62 - 63
Page: 64 - 65
Page: 66 - 67
Page: 68 - 69
Page: 70 - 71
Page: 72 - 73
Page: 74 - 75
Page: 76 - 77
Page: 78 - 79
Page: 80 - 81
Page: 82 - 83
Page: 84 - 85
Page: 86 - 87
Page: 88 - 89
Page: 90 - 91
Page: 92

View the next article from your search or return to your search results.

view the complete issue