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37
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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: THE LINE

Page: 7

Article

THE LINE

ADVERTISING is closeby related to production because it increases consumption, and prosperity depends upon the amount of production that can be absorbed by consumers of the nation.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: Along the Garden Path

Page: 8

Article

Along the Garden Path

SEPTEMBER is the wise uncle of the months. He seems to look at us and say: "Now I don't want to preach, but you can see for yourself. You did not plan to plant enough flowers that bloom late, and last spring everyone had glorious beds of bulbs, but you neglected to order yours. Last year you said you were going to work toward the realization of an outdoor living-room, but you only planted hit-and-miss. Now is the time to revamp the garden and profit, by the mistakes which are fresh in your mind."

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: The Roving Gardener

Pages: 10, 68

Article

The Roving Gardener

THIS is the pleasant month. Come rains that penetrate the earth, so that weeds may be pulled, ground stirred. Grass takes on a fresher tint. The transplanted seedlings begin to spurt. Gaillardia, Coreopsis, delphinium, Viola, and other things take a new lease on life to keep up with Boltonia and monkshood.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: We Have a Perfect Neighbor

Pages: 13, 46

Article

We Have a Perfect Neighbor

I SING the perfect neighbor, my neighbor across the street. In a sense, we-- our family-- had something to do with our neighbor's coming. When the house across the way was up for sale a few years ago, we watched with eager concern the various prospects who came to see it. When the Lucknows appeared, we felt their attraction at once.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: What the Small House Most Needs

Pages: 14, 15, 50

Article

What the Small House Most Needs

NO PROBLEM in building construction is of greater interest to so many persons than that of how to obtain a small house of reasonable cost that is convenient to live in and pleasing to look at. While house design is today generally recognized as an individual architectural problem, yet the design of small houses is all too often viewed in the light of obtaining the most in size for the least money.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: Sanctuary--My Sacred Place of Refuge

Pages: 16, 70, 71

Article

Sanctuary--My Sacred Place of Refuge

FROM my mother, no doubt, I inherited love of flowers and almost everything that springs from the soil. Impatience and a dash of pugnacity are characteristics which unquestionably came down thru my paternal parents' fighting blood. On these foundations I built a garden.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: We Look at Tomorrow's Tulips

Pages: 17, 80, 81

Article

We Look at Tomorrow's Tulips

WOULD you look at the bulb gardens of tomorrow? Then go to the garden of the friend who has today's novelties in tulips, imagine the gazing globe to be the crystal ball of a fortune teller, and by gazing intently therein you may see the nucleus of such a garden.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: The Fourth Dimension in Food

Pages: 18, 77

Article

The Fourth Dimension in Food

IN A GROCERY store in Springfield, Massachusetts, not long ago I saw Springfield homemakers buying fruits, vegetables, meats, and sea foods that had been frozen by the newest of the refrigeration methods which twentieth-century science has been able to pull from its bag of tricks.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: When Your Child Starts to School

Pages: 19, 66, 67

Article

When Your Child Starts to School

THIS morning was to be her first at school. She got out of the car, took a few hesitant steps, then came back again.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: High Secrets of the Joy of Living

Pages: 20, 64, 65

Article

High Secrets of the Joy of Living

THIRTY years ago in Homestead, Pennsylvania, a small, slender, brown-haired boy tightly clutching a bundle of white paper sheets against his shiny knee trousers waved good-by and promised to be home for supper to his mother standing on the steps of a very modest brick cottage, and stepped out into the world.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: The Aviators of Our Gardens

Pages: 21, 82, 83

Article

The Aviators of Our Gardens

MANY of our common butterflies have pretty, descriptive names which are easily learned, and which, when known, add to our outdoor life that pleasure which always comes from being able to greet a flower or bird as a friend and by its right name-- Monarch, Viceroy, Admiral, Clouded Sulphur, Swallowtail, Mourning Cloak, Wood Nymph, Common White, Painted Lady, and many others.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: The Already-built House Also Can Have a Bay Window

Pages: 22, 23

Article

The Already-built House Also Can Have a Bay Window

I LIKE bay windows. If there is one part of a design for a home that adds both to the interest of the interior and exterior, it is the bay window. For a long time its possibilities have been either forgotten or neglected, but, luckily-- particularly luckily for those who have them-- the bay window is again becoming an outstanding part of home design.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: Home Lighting in a Decorative and Modern Manner

Pages: 24, 92

Article

Home Lighting in a Decorative and Modern Manner

ALADDIN had a magic lamp and therein lies a story, but the modern woman is blessed with a thousand magic lights beside which Aladdin's pales into insignificance. Perhaps it is the almost universal use of electricity which has slowly led us to replace one old lamp with three or four new ones, or perhaps it is because our present-day tendency is to want our homes at evening as bright, if not brighter, than in the day.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: How to Have a First-Class Lawn

Pages: 25, 90

Article

How to Have a First-Class Lawn

WITH few exceptions, and those being sections in the extreme North where winters are quite severe, new lawns should be built in the fall. Weeds have then had their annual fling. Moreover, newly seeded grass roots more deeply with cold weather ahead, and most varieties, notably Kentucky Bluegrass, form stools or tiller out, thus forminga dense sod.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: What to Transplant This Fall

Pages: 26, 74, 75

Article

What to Transplant This Fall

FALL is moving time in the garden. As Nature begins to tint the autumn foliage with inimitable colors, we are silently informed that growth activity for the season is over. And with this resting period transplanting time for most of our trees, shrubs, and perennials has arrived.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: The Appropriately Furnished Hall

Page: 27

Article

The Appropriately Furnished Hall

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: A Garden of Sweet Perfume

Pages: 28, 88, 89

Article

A Garden of Sweet Perfume

DURING my long years of garden apprenticeship I have been growing fonder of the sweet-smelling plants. I have eliminated all the roses which do not smell sweetly except a few climbers, and the scentless ones are being replaced gradually. Is it not more sensible to grow a rose vine such as Dr. Van Fleet, whose pale pink flowers dripping down over the garden wall exude a fruity smell, than one whose blossoms are scentless like the ramblers?

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: The Kays Rebuild by Installments

Pages: 30, 63

Article

The Kays Rebuild by Installments

NO, "INSTALLMENT" in this case doesn't mean a dollar down and a dollar a week forever. As a matter of fact, from this angle, it means just the reverse.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: Books That Make School Studies Live

Pages: 31, 59

Article

Books That Make School Studies Live

SOMETIMES there is a teacher who makes a subject really come alive for his or her young pupils, but I am sorry to say that such a teacher is the exception and not the rule. In my own long pilgrimage thru grammar school, high school, and college, I can count such teachers on the fingers of one hand, and I feel certain that you can, too.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: Ways I Like to Cook Vegetables

Pages: 32, 69, 72, 73

Article

Ways I Like to Cook Vegetables

DO YOU ever take an inventory of your methods of cooking vegetables? I have a series of questions that I ask almost every time I approach the sink to wash the garden's offerings. How shall I cook the carrots? Is cold or hot water to be added? When are they to be salted? What is the best way to handle them to produce a tempting dish in which their full food value is retained?

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: A Breakfast Set for the Small Kitchen

Pages: 34, 95

Article

A Breakfast Set for the Small Kitchen

HERE is a breakfast set which can be built without making any great change in the kitchen, and it takes up little or no room when it is folded up out of the way.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: Reviving an Old Craft

Pages: 35, 94

Article

Reviving an Old Craft

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: Such Food as You Never Dreamed Of

Pages: 36, 84, 85

Article

Such Food as You Never Dreamed Of

IMAGINE a big table, the kind a gourmand dreams of, loaded with good things. And when I say loaded, I mean just that. Huge platters of deliciously plump shrimp boiled in their shells and freshly undressed; sardines, salmon, both pickled and smoked; other huge platters of stuffed eggs, beautifully garnished cold roasts of meat, stuffed eels, a big brick of liverworst in a nest of parsley; bowls of red caviar, potato salad, mixed pickles, slices of big white onion, sliced beets in vinegar, stuffed celery; cheese with caraway seed and cheese without caraway seed; steaming dishes of kidney stew, Swedish meat balls (deliciously seasoned); a ham omelet and a fish omelet!

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: A Gladiolus Grower Chooses His Favorite Varieties

Pages: 38, 39, 91

Article

A Gladiolus Grower Chooses His Favorite Varieties

OF ALL known plants, the gladiolus is the easiest to bring to perfection under ordinary conditions and the simplest to keep in good health.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: Pollen Magic Changes Flowers Into Seed Pods

Pages: 40, 54

Article

Pollen Magic Changes Flowers Into Seed Pods

A MONTH has passed since we wandered down Hollyhock Lane and watched the bird, bee, butterfly, and insect garden callers sipping sweet nectar from the flower hostesses and leaving in appreciation their golden gifts of pollen. You remember, Junior Gardeners, as these little callers went into the flower's entry hall they left their pollen gifts on the flower's hall table, which in most cases is the pistil of the flower unless the insect makes a mistake and spills it.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: Portrait of a Lady (not quite)

Page: 41

Article

Portrait of a Lady (not quite)

THERE is sweetness, delicacy, and breeding in this face. And rightly so, for hers is a family of splendid traditions.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: Notes From a Gardener's Scrapbook

Pages: 42, 95, 96

Article

Notes From a Gardener's Scrapbook

OUR motto for September and all other fall months should be: Do everything possible this fall rather than put it off until spring. This is especially true of fall planting, for there are very few things which may not be planted just as well in the fall as in the spring.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: The Laws of Good Building

Page: 44

Article

The Laws of Good Building

IT IS needless to say that those who build for their own occupancy hope to have a well-built house. But if one is to be sure that his new house will stand the tests of time, he must be certain that only good materials and careful workmanshipenter into its construction.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: Clubs for the Juniors

Pages: 48, 93

Article

Clubs for the Juniors

EVER since I began this department in Better Homes and Gardens, I have had in mind to tell you something about the five great national organizations for young people: the Boy Scouts, the Girl Scouts, the Camp Fire Girls, the 4-H Clubs, and The Junior Garden Clubs of America.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: A Junior Garden Club Report

Page: 54

Article

A Junior Garden Club Report

FROM Mrs. Ramona Cottam, counselor of the Junior Gardeners of Provo, Utah, comes this report:

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: When a Woman Shops

Page: 62

Article

When a Woman Shops

A SHORT forecast of the trend that furniture periods are taking will help you in your shopping for the house this fall: We find that Early American holds the interest of the furniture manufacturers. Following Early American closely is French Provincial, and for the more sophisticated buyer there will be combinations of French Empire and Directoire.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: What to Transplant in the Northwest

Pages: 75, 76

Article

What to Transplant in the Northwest

IN THE Northwest we have a rainy and dry season. The rainy season begins usually in September or late in August and lasts thruout the winter into May or June.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: Fourth Dimension in Food

Pages: 78, 79

Article

Fourth Dimension in Food

The physicists and bespectacled men in laboratories have known for the last forty or fifty years that slow freezing produces large ice crystals, and that quick freezing at low temperatures produces small ice crystals. Even specialists in refrigeration knew it. But it took Clarence Birdseye to pounce on the perfectly obvious fact that slow freezing was what was the matter with all known methods of refrigerating foods; and slow freezing formed large ice crystals which ruptured and broke down the tissues.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: The Children's Pleasure Chest

Pages: 86, 87

Article

The Children's Pleasure Chest

AS SOON as school starts, Mary Elizabeth (my daughter) is up betimes! Frequently she bathes, and combs, and gets all ready but for her school dress. Then she slips on an apron and runs down to help me with breakfast, which is a very important meal. While I make Daddy's coffee, Mary Elizabeth goes into the garden for a bouquet.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: A Garden of Sweet Perfume

Page: 90

Article

A Garden of Sweet Perfume

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: Prices of Artcraft Articles

Pages: 94, 95

Article

Prices of Artcraft Articles

No. 687, length of monk's cloth 22 x 28 inches for a rag, with a chart of the design showing color placings, also detailed instructions of number of threads of a color to weave in each direction; price 50 cents.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1930 Magazine Article: ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

Page: 98

Article

ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

ACROSS the editor's desk, so close that it seems I could almost reach out to it as I write, is Pike's Peak. For just a few days of vacation in the hottest weather I have been resting here and absorbing inspiration and information from Nature's own gardens.

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