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50
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Articles:
18
Recipes:
1
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34
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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

Page: 6

Article

ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK

"WHAT are the most needed inventions?"

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: Going to Remodel?

Page: 6

Article

Going to Remodel?

YOU MAY have been thinking for a long time of remodeling your home. Do it now, while material and labor prices are low. By showing us what you do you may, at the same time, win a prize.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: Seeing Thru the Flowers

Page: 7

Article

Seeing Thru the Flowers

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: Every Package Tells a Story

Pages: 9, 28, 30

Article

Every Package Tells a Story

DO YOU pride yourself on being a skilled shopper, when you are buying foods which can be seen and pinched, and yet make mistakes in choosing packaged foods?

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: Aids to Successful Canning

Pages: 10, 11, 36, 37

Article

Aids to Successful Canning

ONE of the larger pieces of equipment which makes canning easy and successful is the pressure canner or cooker, so strongly made of cast aluminum and so tightly sealed that the steam developed is retained and the temperature thereby raised above the boiling point of water in an open kettle, shortening the time necessary to cook and sterilize foods being canned. It is the only method approved by the Bureau of Home Economics for canning non-acid vegetables and meats.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: The Diary of a Plain Dirt Gardener

Pages: 12, 44

Article

The Diary of a Plain Dirt Gardener

JULY 1. The ground was still moist from the recent rain, so I got out a few more delphinium seedlings from the seedframe, together with seedling Shirley Foxgloves, and re-set the Violas to replace those that something, probably cutworms, had played hob with.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: Man's Insect Friends

Pages: 13, 48, 49

Article

Man's Insect Friends

MOST of our insect friends are so common that they are seldom noticed, or at best they are dismissed as being just "bugs" and are destroyed along with the rest. They are often found side by side with extremely destructive insects for the simple reason that they are going right after them, and such circumstantial evidence gains for them the same evil reputation as the destroyers.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: A Small Home for Spacious Living

Pages: 14, 15

Article

A Small Home for Spacious Living

THERE is something so pleasant about the low roof- lines and general proportions of this Cape Cod gardened cottage that it requires only the simplest planting, as indicated by Alfred Carl Hottes, garden-department editor of Better Homes and Gardens, to make it appear completely at home in almost any landscape in America, whether that of the scrubby, flat seacoast where the type originated or one of lofty trees and rolling country.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: The Cost to Build This Home

Page: 15

Article

The Cost to Build This Home

A 2-CENT stamp, for postage and handling, will bring you a complete list of materials required to build this home, with the exact quantities of each item. This list, carefully prepared by experts, is a part of Better Homes and Gardens' BILDCOST GAR- DENED-HOME PLAN.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: Negro Spirituals at Our Own Firesides

Pages: 16, 41, 42, 43

Article

Negro Spirituals at Our Own Firesides

HEN I was a child it was fashionable for people to say, patronizingly, that they loved to hear Negroes sing-- and then to laugh at the songs which issued from the colored Baptist Church.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: New Light on an Old Problem

Pages: 18, 19, 40

Article

New Light on an Old Problem

WHEN I built my home twelve years ago the window specifications said but little more than that they were to be double-hung-- that is, the kind with two sliding sashes. They were to be of a certain kind of wood, of such-and-such sizes, and with so- and-so many panes above and below.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: Junior Scientists and the Trees

Pages: 20, 44, 45

Article

Junior Scientists and the Trees

CAN you guess Nature's best way of cooling the air on these hot summer days? Not oceans, or rivers, or lakes-- these only help cool the air for those who live around them. It is the trees and other plants that furnish the greatest part of the moisture that cools the air which we breathe.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: How to Arrange Cutflowers

Pages: 21, 38, 39

Article

How to Arrange Cutflowers

BY KEEPING in mind a few simple rules you can soon learn to arrange cut- flowers so that they are more pleasing, and with a little practice the results will become beautiful, even distinguished.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: Dancing Lessons? YES, Says Miss Lyndall Drawing Lessons? NO, Says Mr. Darling

Pages: 23, 46, 47

Article

Dancing Lessons? YES, Says Miss Lyndall Drawing Lessons? NO, Says Mr. Darling

THE average child likes to move about to music and really enjoys and derives much benefit, both physically and nervously, from dancing lessons; in fact, I have known of cases of extreme nervousness greatly helped, almost cured, by the development of the rhythmic sense, and sometimes cases of lack of muscular coordination can be helped or cured by a careful dancing teacher.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: Adventuring With Rock-Garden Seeds

Pages: 24, 37

Article

Adventuring With Rock-Garden Seeds

GROWING plants from seeds is always an adventure --a small edition of the adventure of life itself. That these small specks of matter, gathered from all parts of the world, possess something which, with the aid of such commonplace things as water, air, and soil, can develop such striking examples of individuality is a never ending source of wonderment.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: FIRETHORN for Its Gorgeous Fruits

Page: 26

Article

FIRETHORN for Its Gorgeous Fruits

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: ALONG THE GARDEN PATH

Page: 50

Article

ALONG THE GARDEN PATH

JOHN BURROUGHS, the great naturalist, said that Nature abhors a vacuum and therefore does her level best to cover the bare earth with something.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1932 Magazine Article: THE DOVE ORCHID

Page: 50

Article

THE DOVE ORCHID

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