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Pages in Issue:
79
Original Cost:
$0.10 (US)
Dimensions:
7.75w X 11.875h
Articles:
25
Recipes:
4
Advertisements:
65
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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: Across the Editor's Desk

Page: 4

Article

Across the Editor's Desk

IT WAS said of John Muir, the celebrated naturalist, that there were two natures constantly surging within him-- one his devoted love for home, the other his longing to rove in the fields and forests.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: IT'S news TO ME!

Page: 10

Article

IT'S news TO ME!

HERE YOU SEE Nick cooking his specialties for a pair of ravenous State College boys, our guests. Long, unbroken spaghetti slithers in a delicious tomato-soup sauce.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: Memory Garden

Pages: 13, 63

Article

Memory Garden

THAT morning at breakfast delightful old Commodore Benedict reminded me that before going we must see his Friendship Grove.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: Wall Garden Here's How!

Pages: 14, 15, 75, 76, 77

Article

Wall Garden Here's How!

"I'D LIKE to move to Oregon or Massachusetts so I can have a wall garden. But here in this neighborhood I don't need one. My yard is so flat. How I envy those who live in the hills. A few steps up and a few steps down naturally divides the garden into interestingparts.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: A Spring Parade of Wall-coverings Living-Room, Dining-Room Bedrooms, and Bathrooms

Pages: 16, 17

Article

A Spring Parade of Wall-coverings Living-Room, Dining-Room Bedrooms, and Bathrooms

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: Crown Jewels of the Amaryllis Family How to Grow Them

Pages: 18, 19, 81

Article

Crown Jewels of the Amaryllis Family How to Grow Them

DO YOU know the Amaryllis? Perhaps you think you do, but I'd venture you really don't unless you live in California or Florida. By some strange mixing of plant names, the only True Amaryllis grows in South Africa, and the flowers commonly called by that name are really Hippeastrums, which come from South America.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: OUR Garden Jester

Pages: 20, 21, 78, 79, 80

Article

OUR Garden Jester

THE sun is dipping behind the feathery Jacarandas. The garden is slowly recovering from the day's heat, which has surely paled the ruddy faces of the nasturtiums an entire shade since morning. It is nearing dove-time and we are having our tea outside as usual.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: New England Bred and Genuine

Pages: 22, 23, 73

Article

New England Bred and Genuine

THIS demure little white cottage, on the edge of a big city of central New York, is not only tenderly reminiscent of the wayside farmhouses of early New England, but it is the embodiment of New England tradition as well, for the bright picture was patterned after the hearthstones of Colonial forbears.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: Your Silent Servants

Pages: 24, 25, 52, 53

Article

Your Silent Servants

ONE is fortunate indeed to have servants who work cheaply and efficiently-- servants who never grumble, who never have days off when you need them most, and never get long telephone calls. Instead, they're always on the job, bright and shining.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: Daisies Do Tell--in the Garden

Pages: 26, 27, 74, 75

Article

Daisies Do Tell--in the Garden

ACRES of drifting whiteness, breath-taking in their expansive loveliness, greet our eyes each summer as we travel thru the country where the beautiful wild daisies grow.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: Smart Ideas to Stand On!

Page: 30

Article

Smart Ideas to Stand On!

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: Equal Rights For Young Citizens!

Pages: 31, 68, 69

Article

Equal Rights For Young Citizens!

"OH, MOM, have you seen my baseball mitt? We're going to play catch at recess."

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: THE Question Before the House

Pages: 32, 85

Article

THE Question Before the House

MY WHITE woodwork becomes soiled by fingermarks and the like; when I wash it constantly the paint wears off. Is there anything I can do?

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: Pan Calls for Aces

Pages: 33, 51

Article

Pan Calls for Aces

DO YOU hear a strange lilting music in the air, like a clear and pleading bugle that holds us at attention? Then it becomes a song that lures us with Pied Piper tunes.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: Two Centuries Look Down Upon This Home

Pages: 34, 35, 64, 65

Article

Two Centuries Look Down Upon This Home

THE traditions of mature age are coming to this country, even to the comparatively new Middlewest. A proof is seen in this home which I am about to describe to you.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: CROSS-STITCH For Fun

Page: 36

Article

CROSS-STITCH For Fun

THERE may be nothing new under the good old sun, but these clever groupings of cross-stitch "flora and fauna" do seem enticingly different. And cross-stich is such fun to do, either by counting threads to copy a pattern direct, or by simply filling all the little crosses where the design is stamped.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: THE Well-Conducted ILLNESS

Pages: 40, 55, 56, 57

Article

THE Well-Conducted ILLNESS

"I GET along very well in my job as mother as long as the children are well, but when they are sick. ..."!

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: No New Good Novels?

Pages: 42, 48, 49

Article

No New Good Novels? "Oh Yes!"

"BUT aren't there any really good novels coming out? It seems to me that each one I pick up is worse than the last." A challenge like that, with an accusatory note in it, is hurled at me every so often, and leaves me feeling very young, green, and enthusiastic.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: KLEENEX

Page: 50

Article

KLEENEX

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: Right the First Time--That's Economy

Pages: 58, 59

Article

Right the First Time--That's Economy

PRICES of nursery stock have never been lower, so you may plant now at a great saving.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: Can You Pronounce Plant Names?

Pages: 66, 67

Article

Can You Pronounce Plant Names?

ISN'T it fun not only to love plants but really to know them? Isn't it a satisfaction to be able to pronounce their names correctly instead of feeling self-conscious every time you look at a plant and wonder what to call it?

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: The Diary of a Plain Dirt Gardener

Pages: 70, 71, 72

Article

The Diary of a Plain Dirt Gardener

May 1 That blessed sun came up at least a half hour earlier this morning-- honest it did-- just because it is March. Why, it was so bright I didn't need a light when I dashed to the basement for my morning bath under my industrial shower down there.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: WHO WINS the 1933 $3,000

Page: 78

Article

WHO WINS the 1933 $3,000

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: AMONG Ourselves

Pages: 82, 83, 84

Article

AMONG Ourselves

"My fine new carriage... no? And my two gray horses... not enough? A complete set of harness... more yet? Then, all that and 4,000 florins [Dutch gold coins that would buy today at least a pair of automobiles]." One Dutch gentleman paid this assortment about 300 years ago for a single tulip bulb. It was an age of speculation in tulip bulbs and, tho these fabulous prices have passed, tulips are still exciting.

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Better Homes & Gardens March 1934 Magazine Article: Along the Garden Path

Page: 86

Article

Along the Garden Path

COLONEL WILLIAM H. JACKSON, son of General James Jackson, gallant Revolutionary War officer, loved trees, especially a White Oak which he planted with his own hands at Athens, Georgia. In 1820 he recorded a deed which has become historic:

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