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Articles:
40
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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Across the Editor's Desk

Page: 4

Article

Across the Editor's Desk

WELL! Who are these fine-looking people sitting across the desk from you this month? Meet them, in order, from left to right-- Royal Barry Wills, of Boston; Verna Cook Salomonsky, of New York; Russell Walcott, of Chicago, and John Normile, of Des Moines, all architects.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: The Diary of a Plain Dirt Gardener

Pages: 8, 134, 135

Article

The Diary of a Plain Dirt Gardener

Easter morn. Church time came and off the family went. leaving me to read the papers. But Donald was going to sing in the children's choir. So I took the old car and surreptitiously followed into town. Ed Heil, one of the ushers, nearly fainted when he saw me coming up the church steps, it was such a strange sight.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: IT'S News TO ME!

Page: 10

Article

IT'S News TO ME!

I'M PLANNING an April kitchen shower for a bride-to-be, one of those chattery affairs where gifts are passed for close inspection, and we all talk at once!

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Here It Is!

Pages: 13, 14, 15, 16, 17

Article

Here It Is!

TAKE another look at the cover. If you built this Georgian house and wanted to get this same perspective of it, we rather suspect you'd have to climb the tallest tree on the other side of the street from it and sit on the topmost branch.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Little Things in the House You Might Forget

Pages: 18, 19, 82, 83

Article

Little Things in the House You Might Forget

THE HOUSE, as you have seen, is beautifully planned and arranged for the elementary, the essential, functions of living. The size, number, and shape of the rooms and their relation to each other are exactly as they should be for the ideal home.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Welcome to Our Open-House! Better Homes & Gardens Shows You Thru the Georgian Gardened Home

Pages: 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 93, 94, 95

Article

Welcome to Our Open-House! Better Homes & Gardens Shows You Thru the Georgian Gardened Home

ITS WHITE door thrown open in welcome, its hospitable rooms glowing with light and color, the Georgian House eagerly awaits our room-to-room trip of inspection.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: CO-OPERATING WITH BETTER HOMES & GARDEN

Pages: 20, 95

Article

CO-OPERATING WITH BETTER HOMES & GARDEN

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: And Here's the Basement!

Pages: 27, 60

Article

And Here's the Basement!

LONG a dingy and neglected stepchild, the basement comes at last into its own as a respectable and attractive member of the family! This happy state of affairs is due of course to the bright, clean, and noiseless equipment for heating the house and doing its laundry, doing away entirely with all the old dirt and messiness and making it possible for the family to double its actual recreation space without increasing the size of the house.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: So You're Going to Build a Pool!

Pages: 28, 29, 108, 109

Article

So You're Going to Build a Pool!

"SO YOU'RE going to build a pool!" These words broke into my thoughts, and I turned from under a large willow to see Uncle John coming down the path.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Prizewinners

Pages: 30, 31

Article

Prizewinners

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: We Can Conquer

Pages: 32, 106, 107

Article

We Can Conquer

HOW often we have entered a beautiful garden, fascinated by its design and the perfect splendor of its plants, only to find that the shady spots are either barren or that the plants growing there are unhappy.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: DROUTH

Pages: 33, 109, 110, 111

Article

DROUTH

"BUT I can't have a garden," says the little lady as she wistfully looks at the gay flowers pictured in the catalog. "Our water supply is limited and you know how it is."

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: More Prizewinners in the 1934 Better Homes Contest

Pages: 34, 35

Article

More Prizewinners in the 1934 Better Homes Contest

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Inside the Homes of Oberammergau

Pages: 36, 39, 78, 79

Article

Inside the Homes of Oberammergau

A GLIMPSE of Oberammergau, caught as we chugged into the valley by bus from Munich, was enough to set me to wondering how this toy hamlet, tucked in beside the winding, swiftly flowing Amer River among the Tyrolean Alps could possibly find accommodations for 6,000 additional souls.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Short-Cuts and Tips

Pages: 40, 58, 124, 125

Article

Short-Cuts and Tips

THERE is a problem that is the same for the home Saturday-afternoon gardener and the one who wishes to have a garden at a shore, lake, or mountain resort.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Dine From Your Emergency Shelf

Page: 46

Article

Dine From Your Emergency Shelf

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Bulbs

Pages: 48, 129, 130

Article

Bulbs

WITH the advent of spring, lengthening days, and the tangy smell of green things growing, tardy gardeners are invariably assailed with regrets. Nurserymen and seedhouses are besieged with letters and telephone calls-- "Have you any of those Heavenly Blue Grape-hyacinths?" "Can I plant tulips now?"

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: AMONG Ourselves

Pages: 52, 98

Article

AMONG Ourselves

MRS. S. L. COLEMAN, Fountain Inn, South Carolina, wins the $10 in our Whims and Hobbies Contest. Here is her entry:

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article:

Pages: 54, 57, 86, 87

Article

"We Create Beauty Ourselves"

RUPERT HUGHES lives on one of Hollywood's loveliest but busiest boulevards, so I was rather traffic-weary when I stepped up onto his cobblestone path. But there I forgot this hectic world instantly, for Silver Birch trees cast their playful shadows on the path, and as I came to the great carved door with an exquisite grille surrounding it, I sensed a mellowness in his home that comes to houses only after generations of humans have lived in them.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: We Re-discover Ceilings

Page: 66

Article

We Re-discover Ceilings

IN THE photograph below, take a good look at the ceiling. Notice it is darker than the sidewall-- nearly as dark as the floorcovering. Indeed, it is a very important decorative feature of the room. With the lush color scheme of rose to blue, the carpet pictured is dull rose, the ceiling a charming tone of robin's-egg blue, with touches of rose in the bedspread, white walls, and silver-with-blue wallpaper border.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Baby's Corner of the Room

Page: 68

Article

Baby's Corner of the Room

IT ISN'T always possible for the new baby to have a room alone. What to do with his seemingly vast equipment then becomes a question.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Digging and Sowing

Pages: 72, 73, 74

Article

Digging and Sowing

MARCH has awakened me with a call to garden arms. I fly to my trusty, and, I fear, rusty, rake. I fortify myself with sharpened spade.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: An Ancient Partnership

Page: 75

Article

An Ancient Partnership

THE above plant firm, known also as the Lichen (pronounced ly'ken) Company, existed ages before man appeared on the earth. For thousands of years-- perhaps for millions-- it has led a successful existence and has been responsible for the improvement of many a barren region.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: New Lawns

Page: 78

Article

New Lawns

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Important News!

Page: 81

Article

Important News!

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Parents' METHODS

Pages: 84, 85

Article

Parents' METHODS

WE HAVE done away with the wrangling so often incident to the appearance at mealtimes of improperly groomed children.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Light for the House on the Cover

Pages: 26, 96, 97

Article

Light for the House on the Cover

ONE of the guiding principles of the country's leading illuminating engineers is that no source of light should be directly visible. Their aim in lighting a house is to simulate natural outdoor daylight, and, they point out, the best outdoor lighting prevails on a day when the sun is slightly obscured and we can see clearly and steadily without any feeling of eye strain such as is experienced in strong sunlight.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Flowers

Page: 99

Article

Flowers

A GOOD vegetable garden is something much to be admired, and it can be made beautiful; it can be landscaped, so to speak.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Let's Go to the Flower Show to Learn About Gardening

Pages: 100, 101, 102, 103

Article

Let's Go to the Flower Show to Learn About Gardening

WHAT a place a flower show is to learn all about gardening-- the pleasures, the work, the gardeners themselves. No day is long enough, no physique sufficiently rugged, to take it all in in the time allotted. And this keeps up indefinitely. Even after nineteen years' contact and experience with flower shows, from the largest to the smallest, I still feel the same urge to see another.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: No Substitute

Page: 104

Article

No Substitute

SHOES! Kid Gloves! Purses! Traveling Bags and Suitcases! What would we do without leather?-- for here is something for which no substitute has ever been found.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: He's an Artist with Cheese Fritters

Page: 105

Article

He's an Artist with Cheese Fritters

TO RISE from a humble pastry shop in an obscure village in France, thru a gamut of apprenticeships in metropolitan hotels, and at last to land on one's feet in the exclusive and swanky Duquesne Club in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania-- truly, that's something!

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: April Smiles AND KITCHENS COME CLEAN

Pages: 112, 113, 114, 115

Article

April Smiles AND KITCHENS COME CLEAN

ALL confused and blusning are our kitchens-- and it's the candid April sun that has frolicked in and given them away. Those scowling pots and pans, small Son's smudges beside the door, the linoleum we've licked and promised for months-- there are simply dozens of sad-looking places just clamoring for brush, broom, and cleansing powder.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: The Stories of the Prize Winners!

Pages: 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122

Article

The Stories of the Prize Winners!

STARTING with a three-room house, we decided, after a little study, that we saw possibilities of converting our little house into an artistic small home; so we built on two rooms 16 by 18 feet and one 11 by 13 feet across the front of our old house, also a porch 7 by 13 feet.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article:

Page: 121

Article

"A Ring on That Certain Finger!"

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Confessions of a Good Cook

Page: 123

Article

Confessions of a Good Cook

Here's a bright thought for April cooks! Grated pineapple with plenty of juice is a big addition to plain white or yellow butter cake. Use it in place of the liquid called for and you have a brand new variation of an old stand-by.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Two Good Genii

Page: 126

Article

Two Good Genii

EVERY reader of "The Arabian Nights" remembers the Genii, those powerful spirits who so miraculously influenced and directed the affairs of men. Today we also have good Genii whose achievements have been no less marvelous, the Genii of Science and Advertising.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Appliqué for Your Home

Page: 128

Article

Appliqué for Your Home

CHILDREN'S clothing, luncheon linens, quilts, and 'kerchiefs-- they've all sported homemade appliqué for years. Now something new turns up on the artcraft horizon --gay appliqué designs especially suited for wall-hangings, pillow tops, and table mats.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: The Question Before the House

Page: 131

Article

The Question Before the House

If end-matched flooring is purchased, whether inch or the thin three-eighth inch, and a quilt of good paper is laid atop the old floor, the new floor can be laid in the same direction with reasonable safety. Care should be taken that no peaks and valleys exist in the old floor, else the same peaks and valleys will be in the newly laid one.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: Garden Toggery

Pages: 132, 133

Article

Garden Toggery

WITH the out-of-doors season almost here, we realize a need for extra porch pillows of gay awning stripe that can be run up on the machine. The becoming gardening ensemble of sunbonnet and matching gauntlet-tops procurable for gloves is machine-made likewise-- so you see these all may be the work of one rainy afternoon.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1935 Magazine Article: ALONG THE Garden Path

Page: 136

Article

ALONG THE Garden Path

WHY does everyone wish he could write a poem in springtime? We seem to be so full of joy --the ice gone, the trees bursting into leaf, the lawn has become a sheet of emerald tufts.

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