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Pages in Issue:
60
Original Cost:
$0.10 (US)
Dimensions:
7.875w X 12.0h
Articles:
20
Recipes:
1
Advertisements:
38
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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: Across the Editor's Desk

Page: 4

Article

Across the Editor's Desk

GEORGE did it. You may remember that J. Horace McFarland wrote, for the October issue last year, a story entitled "Let George Do It," showing how difficult it is to beautify a city when people are forever "passing the buck."

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: IT'S News TO ME!

Page: 8

Article

IT'S News TO ME!

"AT HALF-PAST dusk of a summer day," says Nick, "it's time to rest a bit. And the place? Our own small veranda!" So in the sketch you see him screening our porch for very pleasant sitting. Nick and our odd-jobs carpenter made the screens in our garage. (Or, ask tor price quotations from your millwork company for screens to specifications!)

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: THE Diary OF A PLAIN DIRT GARDENER

Pages: 10, 62, 63

Article

THE Diary OF A PLAIN DIRT GARDENER

July 1 Sunday, and walking about, I see that some of my annual seeds, sown the last day of April in that big bed, are just coming thru the ground and those that are thru haven't made much growth yet. We're having a drouth-- a terrible one.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: They All Loved Good Food

Pages: 13, 14, 15

Article

They All Loved Good Food

TO HAVE entertained Caruso, Kipling, Sousa, Madame Melba, "Mark Twain" and others of the world's famous is a rare experience granted to but few fortunate hostesses. Mary Warren, in these intimate glimpses of fascinating Belfast, pictures delightfully high-light moments from her memories of these well-loved men and women who dined with her on the Irish Isle.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: We Invite Everyone to Use Our Garden

Pages: 18, 19, 46, 47

Article

We Invite Everyone to Use Our Garden

"GOOD morning, Garden Lady." I lifted my head from the tulips and daffodils I was removing from their early winter pit to see my old friend Jennie McLeod coming in our garden gate. I had not seen Jennie since she had left to tour Alaska.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: Copper THE FRIENDLIEST METAL

Pages: 20, 21, 51, 60, 61

Article

Copper THE FRIENDLIEST METAL

WHEN you and I were very young copper was our first love among the metals. It was the first metal, in fact, of which we became sharply conscious. Its chief magic was that, in the form of a bright, beautiful, glittering, newly minted copper cent, it had the mysterious property of being exchangeable for a stick of peppermint or wintergreen candy striped like a barberpole and tasting as no candy has ever tasted since.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: Flocks of Phlox You Shouldn't Do Without

Pages: 22, 23, 47, 49

Article

Flocks of Phlox You Shouldn't Do Without

WHATEVER we should do without phlox in the July garden, I can't imagine. It takes so little ground space all spring, then gives such a wealth of color just when and where we want it, for a choice planting of the better garden phlox surpasses even the most enthusiastic catalog descriptions.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: How to Freshen Out door Furniture

Pages: 24, 25, 59

Article

How to Freshen Out door Furniture

WISH you could see some of the repainted porch and garden furniture in our neighborhood. It looks like new, and is so very decorative!

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: There Are TRICKS to Cool Homemaking

Pages: 26, 58

Article

There Are TRICKS to Cool Homemaking

PERHAPS it's the bubbling thermometer or the humidity, but it's a certain thing that these limp days our cleaning schedule has lost its zest.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: THE MAN NEXT DOOR

Page: 28

Article

THE MAN NEXT DOOR

A fine old family's decay begins when it postpones mowing the lawn until the annual vacation visit of its second-best son-in-law.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: THE Question BEFORE THE HOUSE

Page: 32

Article

THE Question BEFORE THE HOUSE

MY hardwood floors are scratched and worn. They have been revarnished three or four times and putting more varnish on top of what is there now will not improve them, I'm sure. Is there some way this old varnish can be taken off without its being such a hard, messy job?

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: New England Goes to Arkansas

Page: 34

Article

New England Goes to Arkansas

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: Porch Pick-ups

Pages: 36, 37

Article

Porch Pick-ups

TRAVEL bulletins and vacation plans are tremendously busy these days supplanting seed catalogs as favorite family literature. It's going to be great fun to be lazy for a while after all the digging of last month. But there are lots of ways of relaxing. We can loll and think of all the ambitious projects to be accomplished next fall. Or we can still loll luxuriously-- and at the same time dip into bits of porch or beach pick-up work to bolster up our alibis.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: Salad Magic Exposed

Page: 45

Article

Salad Magic Exposed

THINGS have happened in the art of saladry. Almost overnight a new technique has flashed upon the scene, which creates in the salad course a memory to toy with.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: When Children are Naughty

Pages: 38, 39, 48

Article

When Children are Naughty

MILLICENT wasn't a bad child exactly, and yet she wasn't as good as she ought to have been. She wasn't sick, but she wasn't sturdy and blooming. There was nothing seriously wrong, yet her parents were concerned because they could see that neither was everything quite all right.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article:

Page: 49

Article

"Cool Draughts for Thirsty Days"

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: You Can Have a Gardenhouse This Year

Page: 50

Article

You Can Have a Gardenhouse This Year

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: It's Fun to Bud Plants

Pages: 52, 53, 54, 55

Article

It's Fun to Bud Plants

WHEN I tell people I have 10 kinds of apples, 20 kinds of pears, and 10 kinds of plums and prunes, which give me an ample fruit supply covering virtually the entire fruiting season, they wonder how I can have them in such a small place.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: It's July, So--Water, Mulch, and Stake

Pages: 56, 57

Article

It's July, So--Water, Mulch, and Stake

THE garden in July gives luxuriously and asks so little. At no other time will it present so alluring a retreat to cool, green depths and fresh foliage fragrance. All it asks is a little thoughtful attention that is easy and pleasurable to give. It wants watering, mulching, and staking-- activities that are so interesting they are really fun.

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Better Homes & Gardens July 1935 Magazine Article: ALONG THE Garden Path

Page: 64

Article

ALONG THE Garden Path

AT THE age of 8, Carl von Linne, who in later years was known as Carolus Linnaeus, set apart a portion of his yard which he called his botanical garden. His interest in plants increased year by year, until finally he has become the great godfather of botany. Writers thru all the years had called each plant by various names, but in Linnaeus' hands he gave each plant one name and set the custom, among other things, of naming plants for people.

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