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96
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7.625w X 12.0h
Articles:
33
Recipes:
2
Advertisements:
65
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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: ACROSS THE Editor's DESK

Page: 4

Article

ACROSS THE Editor's DESK

PAUL FRESE, garden editor of Better Homes & Gardens, says some kind of a bird has been picking leaves out of the gutters on his house and flicking them out. A mighty helpful, if eccentric bird. But there are other birds that do still more good to humanity by consuming enormous numbers of insect pests. Without birds this world would soon be a barren desert. Give them a break.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: A PLACE IN THE Sun

Page: 7

Article

A PLACE IN THE Sun

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: THE Diary OF A PLAIN DIRT GARDENER

Pages: 8, 109

Article

THE Diary OF A PLAIN DIRT GARDENER

It rained-- rained all day long and too wet to do any work outdoors. I put on my old clothes, tho, and waded thru the wetness to gather groceries --right off our own vines and stalks and bushes, to wit: sweet corn, tomatoes, cabbage, green peppers, and the first mess of broccoli.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: IT'S NEWS TO ME!

Page: 12

Article

IT'S NEWS TO ME!

AN IRONER is good news at our house-- the flatwork is child's play, and an instruction book explains in detail about ironing the fussy wearables. I'm learning the tricks! To press with our ironer, we stop the roll.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: THE BUILDING BOOM'LL Get You If You Don't Watch Out!

Pages: 17, 64, 66

Article

THE BUILDING BOOM'LL Get You If You Don't Watch Out!

SINCE 1933 Better Homes & Gardens has forecast improvement in-real-estate activity. Last January we predicted that a real-estate and building boom was on the way, quoting facts and statistics compiled by our Bureau of Market Analysis and by outstanding economists to back up the prediction.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: PLANT DAFFODILS FOR SPRINGTIME

Pages: 18, 19, 101, 102, 103

Article

PLANT DAFFODILS FOR SPRINGTIME

APPARENTLY for people everywhere there have been associations of seasons or of places with special plants that become so fixed, so idealized, that they're part of life itself. For me the return of spring means one thing-- the return of daffodils-- and while the early garden excursions for the first snowdrop or anemone, or wild tulip or species crocus or whatever it may be are keen and eager, they're always accompanied by a more keen, more eager investigation to see how the daffodil shoots are coming along, pushing up thru the earth in border and woodlot.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: MOULDING THE Quints

Pages: 20, 21, 78, 79, 80, 81

Article

MOULDING THE Quints

THE other day on my fifth visit to the tiny French-Canadian village of Callander, in the lovely lake and woods district of Northern Ontario, I watched the five sweethearts of the world for almost an hour, and I came away with a lump in my throat.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: A STUDY IN Good Planning

Pages: 22, 23

Article

A STUDY IN Good Planning

THE small house has lately become a large problem. It's because the small house must serve the purpose of a large house. Architect Walter Bradnee Kirby, of New Canaan, Connecticut, has solved the problem with great success in a series of houses at Glenbrook, Connecticut, of which this is one.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: Cracks YOU CAN'T LAUGH OFF

Pages: 24, 25, 77

Article

Cracks YOU CAN'T LAUGH OFF

JUST think of the number of times your harassed eye has followed the line of a brand-new crack wriggling its nonchalant way across your plaster wall or ceiling, reminding you of a map of the Mississippi or the Amazon. Think of that beautiful paneled door which, in the second winter of its infancy, allowed the blessed outer air to enter, even tho closed.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: AN OLD HOUSE SPROUTS NEW Wings

Pages: 26, 76

Article

AN OLD HOUSE SPROUTS NEW Wings

FRAZIER FORMAN PETERS, architect and author, has remodeled many old New England houses for others, but the "Homestead," at Chestnut Hill, near Westport, Connecticut, he restored for his own use. He admits that he was less concerned with economy than with making just what he wanted of it. He overcame a bad case of shabbiness and disrepair, added rooms, and in the end he has a house, as you can see, of unusual appeal and livability in which none of the subtle, pleasant quality of another period was lost.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: FOR AN UP-AND-COMING FAMILY

Pages: 27, 84, 85

Article

FOR AN UP-AND-COMING FAMILY

PLANNING of a home today, more than ever before, requires careful and exact thinking, as the demands on the home of an alert and active family are widening and increasing all the time. To provide a maximum use of the various rooms without any friction between the individuals or groups involved is an essential part of the problem.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: GARDENING IN THE American Manner

Pages: 28, 29

Article

GARDENING IN THE American Manner

"THIS brush has to be grubbed out. It's a nuisance building on such rough land, you know! But only by getting out of town could we afford to buy a sizable piece of land."

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: Furnishings IN THE WILLIAMSBURG SPIRIT

Pages: 30, 31, 86, 87

Article

Furnishings IN THE WILLIAMSBURG SPIRIT

LIKE stepping back thru the looking-glass of time is a trip today to Williamsburg, Virginia, in the eighteenth century the capital city of England's proudest colony. On the soft southern breeze the British flag of that period is flying. The coat of arms of the House of Hanover adorns the Governor's Palace. Lovely ladies in the exhibition buildings wear billowing Colonial gowns.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: I COULDN'T Believe IT

Pages: 32, 33

Article

I COULDN'T Believe IT

I SIMPLY couldn't believe that in this little 8 by 8-foot room designed by the Singer Sewing Machine Company there could be hidden real magic. Yet these photographs tell the story of what unfolded before my startled, delighted eyes.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: New England COOKS FOR EXPERTS

Pages: 34, 35, 68, 69

Article

New England COOKS FOR EXPERTS

THE mellow light of New England Indian summer falls on a harvest scene rich with golden squash, crimson apples, variegated hues of small fruits, and fresh deep greens of late vegetables being rushed to market. It's the season when many of the traditional foods are at their best, and New England hospitality makes the most of a bountiful larder and good cooking.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: Under Pressure

Pages: 36, 89, 92, 93

Article

Under Pressure

WHENEVER I sing the praises of my pressure cooker for canning, I'm sure to be asked, "But what do you do with it the rest of the year?" "Not a week goes by but what I use it," is my reply, and it is a surprise to many homemakers.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: A PLACE TO Play

Page: 41

Article

A PLACE TO Play

A PRACTICAL demonstration of what can be made of the prosaic basement by planning, patience, and spare-time work is illustrated in this recreation room in the home of Ira J. Witmer, Cleveland architect.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article:

Pages: 42, 98, 99, 100

Article

"What Do You Mean, Born"

"PLEASE send us a list of books you can recommend that will help answer our 8-year-old Harry when he asks, 'What do you mean, born?' As our youngster grows up, I want him to continue to come to me for such information, so he'll not pick up a lot of trash from outside sources."

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: WE TAKE OUT Pie lnsurance

Page: 44

Article

WE TAKE OUT Pie lnsurance

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: TRICKS WITH Quilt-making Tactics

Pages: 46, 73

Article

TRICKS WITH Quilt-making Tactics

PATCHWORK'S primarily for quilts, of course. But all the good old quilt-making tricks-- piecing, appliqué, and quilting-- may double in other fields as well. You may piece chair seats or pillows, or put your talents to work on a crazy-patch lounging coat of rich silks and velvets which will put Joseph's coat to shame.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: Line-Up FOR LAUNDERING

Pages: 48, 82, 83

Article

Line-Up FOR LAUNDERING

SHEETS, towels, table linens, and a fresh, clean start in wearables for our families every day mean large launderings! An electric washer is really a must. If you're still depending entirely on a hand iron, once you've used an ironer you'll agree it's imperative, too. The gadgets and devices we show here are optional equipment. Each piece, we think, will be useful to some of you!

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: We Buy a Puppy

Page: 50

Article

We Buy a Puppy

WE WERE determined that another winter would find a puppy on our hearth. Time was when we chose one because he held his head just so, with no thought of his future appearance or temperamental characteristics. Now we owned our home, knew the thrill of accumulating good things-- and wanted a good dog, too.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: YOU CAN BUILD THIS Playhouse

Page: 52

Article

YOU CAN BUILD THIS Playhouse

DESIGNED to be used by the children, this playhouse can later be put to the practical use of tool storage. Or, with head room and other dimensions increased proportionately, it will serve very well as a workshop. In any case, surrounded by shrubbery, it will be something of a scenic asset in one corner of the garden.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: Echoes FROM THE LONG AGO

Pages: 56, 87, 88

Article

Echoes FROM THE LONG AGO

THERE'S really nothing left to the imagination in Currier and Ives prints, but that's why we prize these living documents and records of a time that can never come again. They're charming and quaint, yet we're forced to admit that they aren't splendid works of art, and that very few histories of lithography even mention them, but they have an appeal upon even slight acquaintance which most of us can't resist.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: WHY NOT TRY Freesias?

Pages: 59, 72

Article

WHY NOT TRY Freesias?

"WHAT is that enchanting fragrance?" My friend was slipping off coat and gloves on a windy, disagreeable day in March and at the same time sniffing the air in an unsophisticated manner.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: AN AMERICAN COMPOSER AT HOME

Pages: 60, 94, 95, 96, 97

Article

AN AMERICAN COMPOSER AT HOME

SO GO the words of Mah Lindy Lou, one of the sweetest and most beloved of all songs of the Southland. It's a song in which the composer truly takes herself-- and her hearers as well-- back to that gracious land that gave her birth.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: ROADS TO GOOD Programs

Page: 67

Article

ROADS TO GOOD Programs

ANOTHER club season begins, and again it's my joyous task to share your aspirations and accomplishments. What rare encouragement your generous letters have been to me thru the seven exciting years I've worked with you! Across the miles, I thank you.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 72

Article

Article

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: THE MAN NEXT DOOR

Pages: 74, 75

Article

THE MAN NEXT DOOR

After a sunny vacation, it's undeniable that a woman's well-tanned shoulder blades in an evening gown seem much more virile than her husband's sunburnt bald-spot.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: THE Question BEFORE THE HOUSE

Pages: 90, 91

Article

THE Question BEFORE THE HOUSE

WHAT is structural glass tile? It's an opaque, fire-polished glass produced in more than 25 shades. It's attracting attention among homeowners and architects, because, aside from sanitary considerations, it's a medium of exquisite beauty for many interior uses, such as for wainscoting and trim, for walls in bathrooms and kitchens, and for decorative panels.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: CIRCUMSTANTIAL Evidence

Pages: 104, 105, 106, 107

Article

CIRCUMSTANTIAL Evidence

IT WAS the restful, quiet hour that immediately follows sundown. I was seated with a friend, on his front porch, enjoying a smoke and watching the twilight shadows lengthen across the lawn.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: FASCINATING FLOWER FACTS

Page: 108

Article

FASCINATING FLOWER FACTS

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1937 Magazine Article: ALONG THE GARDEN PATH

Page: 110

Article

ALONG THE GARDEN PATH

ONE summer, while my family played Daniel Boone in the wilds of Pennsylvania, we rented our Long Island place to the world's grandest tenants --a flower-loving, conscientious, and energetic couple, without children, dogs, cats, or otherhorticulturally abrasive appurtenances.

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