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82
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Articles:
33
Recipes:
5
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73
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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Tattle Tales

Page: 3

Article

Tattle Tales

WHEN Ray Giles set out to write a book on sleep [Sleep! for Greater Power and Achievement, Bobbs-Merrill, $1.75], he thought it would be difficult to throw 50,000 words together, so little had been done previously in gathering the facts about life's third most interesting subject (1. Food; 2. Love).

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Like a friendly handclasp

Page: 7

Article

Like a friendly handclasp

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: THE DIARY of a Plain Dirt Gardener

Pages: 8, 83, 84

Article

THE DIARY of a Plain Dirt Gardener

This bright late afternoon, out in overalls, I had my notebook along and gave myself a lesson in what the la-de-da gardeners call antirrhinums, but which in plain-dirt-gardener language are known as snapdragons. Mine right now are in fine bloom.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: It's News to Me!

Page: 10

Article

It's News to Me!

Now hybrid flowering crabs, white in spring with bloom, give highly edible autumn fruit for the jelly shelf! University of South Dakota's Dr. N. E. Hansen has crossed the hardiest Siberian crab apples with our own types, explains Alfred Hottes. One is the Dolga Crab. [5 to 6 foot, $2.50, Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc., East Boxford, Mass.]

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Profit in Your Possessions

Pages: 13, 71, 72

Article

Profit in Your Possessions

MOST PEOPLE, particularly young people just starting out in married life, need to work out for themselves a well-defined philosophy with respect to possessions.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Truly Yours

Pages: 14, 15

Article

Truly Yours

THERE'S something about a smartly designed monogram that gives a lift to whatever it's on. Perhaps it's that "all our own" look that magically makes the simplest things elegant, the fine pieces positively luxurious. Anyway, it's good news that monograms are just as popular as ever and are turning up all over the country in a host of clever new styles.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Bosom Companions for Bulbs

Pages: 16, 17, 82, 83

Article

Bosom Companions for Bulbs

PERHAPS when you sat down last winter to think of better combinations for your garden, you searched the catalogs and wondered whether the Valentin Tulip after all is the proper color to go well with the Alyssum Basket of Gold, and whether the effect would be heightened by edging it with English Daisies.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Make War on the Weather!

Pages: 18, 69, 70

Article

Make War on the Weather!

WHEN the snow's on, you can tell an uninsulated house a mile away. The roof betrays it.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Rolling Hill

Pages: 19, 20, 21, 22, 23

Article

Rolling Hill

"WITH the children all gone the house seems so huge!" Doctor Holbrook and I so often had heard this lament from our friends, as big homes, with a room for each child, gradually emptied as each young member set out for himself, leaving parents with too many rooms, too much loneliness.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Indoor GARDENING GUIDE

Page: 24

Article

Indoor GARDENING GUIDE

AS WE near the autumnal revel in crimson and tawny leaves, purple asters, and goldenrod, a swift, cold day brings warning that our indoor gardens must be ready to serve as cheery substitutes for spring and summer bloom. While our indoor gardens may not be things of beauty like those outside, they'll seem lovely because it's winter and all outdoors is drab. Like pets, they're our handiwork, grown from a mere leaf or cutting, or rejuvenated from an old plant. In September we prepared ourselves with those essentials to a successful indoor garden-- rich, loamy soil, clean containers, and convenient tools.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Outdoor GARDENING GUIDE

Page: 25

Article

Outdoor GARDENING GUIDE

OCTOBER-- what memory-pictures and sensations it gives us! Indian Summer, autumn color-- frosts-- falling leaves-- the last blooms-- plants going to seed-- and finally the silhouette of bare branches, some with bright-colored bark, others with colored fruits.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Colleges for Canines

Pages: 26, 27, 80

Article

Colleges for Canines

MOST of the 13 million dogs in America have bad manners. This, however, is not the fault of the dogs, but of their owners; and the owners and their friends, provoked by muddy paws, yapping, and disobedience, have begun to do something about it.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Something Old Something New!

Pages: 28, 29, 74, 75

Article

Something Old Something New!

IN EVERY whitewashed brick and gay cornice of this cheerful and compact home in Washington Park, Seattle, there's a match for the sunshine, color, and laughter of its happy family; and that's just as a house should be.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Concrete Example of a DREAM HOUSE

Pages: 30, 80, 81

Article

Concrete Example of a DREAM HOUSE

POSSIBLY there's one home-builder in a thousand who doesn't want modern step-saving convenience and intimate comfort built into every room and passageway of a house.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Make a Welsh Dresser-- and a Chair

Page: 40

Article

Make a Welsh Dresser-- and a Chair

THE sight of a shining hammer and saw, to say nothing of the smell of new lumber, had always given me the urge to build something.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: From Three Little Rooms

Page: 42

Article

From Three Little Rooms

AGAINST the background of Temple Hills, where they look down majestically upon the Pacific Ocean and Laguna Beach, California, you'll find this inviting little home of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey S. Abbott.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Three R's NEW STYLE

Pages: 44, 65, 66, 67

Article

Three R's NEW STYLE

"AND now it's a tutor for Jerry!" Mrs. Smith lamented. "He's having a terrible time with his reading-- can't seem to get it at all."

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: THE MAN NEXT DOOR

Page: 46

Article

THE MAN NEXT DOOR

Not long after Labor Day the b. w. begins to talk about starting the heating plant and I always look at last winter's fuel bills, and remind her of the lovely Indian summer that's coming.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Sleeping Recipes For Better Homes & Bedrooms

Pages: 48, 49, 50

Article

Sleeping Recipes For Better Homes & Bedrooms

DISCUSS sleep with architects. Or sound out furniture dealers and interior decorators on the subject.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Whims & Hobbies

Page: 51

Article

Whims & Hobbies

When Mrs. Kathryn Church, of Santa Barbara, California, has guests for dinner she asks them to sign their names on a fine white linen tablecloth (used on the table when the family has guests). She then embroiders the names in white before the cloth goes to the laundry.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: WHAT NOW, Gourd Grower?

Pages: 52, 53

Article

WHAT NOW, Gourd Grower?

THIS is the season when otherwise nice men and women ruin the gourds it has taken them all spring and summer to grow. They did have such high hopes for them too, because just everybody now is ornamenting the house with them or cutting them into birdhouses and dippers and spoons and water bottles and things like that.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: The Picture on the Cover

Page: 53

Article

The Picture on the Cover

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Light-as-a-Feather

Pages: 56, 57

Article

Light-as-a-Feather

It's the most deliriously tantalizing aroma in all the realm of smells --the spice-laden whiff that emanates from the kitchen when gingerbread comes all dark and moist, rich and crusty from the oven. It stacks up as reason No. 1 why young folks don't leave home but linger hungrily at the kitchen door for that first warm slice of goodness.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Ask Me Another!

Pages: 58, 59

Article

Ask Me Another!

Q. In our new home we're enameling the woodwork a light ivory. Will it be all right to leave the doors dark? I've two small children who leave finger marks wherever they go and I want to avoid unnecessary cleaning.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: HERE'S AN Idea!

Pages: 60, 61

Article

HERE'S AN Idea!

RE-DOING the youngster's bedroom? Fixing up the kitchen? Generally brightening your home? Or do you just wish you could-- but shudder at decorators' prices?

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Don't Furnish in HASTE

Pages: 62, 63

Article

Don't Furnish in HASTE

"BARGAIN SALE! Everything cut to the bone!" How tempting that sounds if you're just at the point of furnishing a new home or refurnishing an old one! But hold everything.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: COLOR in the kitchen

Page: 63

Article

COLOR in the kitchen

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Tips on LAWN CARE

Page: 64

Article

Tips on LAWN CARE

IF ALL the dollars spent on lawns in America were put end to end, we have no idea how far they'd extend. But lay down the dollars wasted by false starts, patch jobs, and failure to observe simple rules, and they'd make a bright green strip across the country.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article:

Page: 67

Article

"She ain't what she used to be"

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Trim Limbs This Way

Page: 68

Article

Trim Limbs This Way

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Annuities Can Be Flexible

Page: 73

Article

Annuities Can Be Flexible

MOST of us are familiar with the annuity which offers a fixed income for life. But during the past few years another type of immediate annuity has come into existence. Let's see why Paul B., a businessman who retired early in 1936, decided to divide his annuity funds between the old nonparticipating and the new participating annuities.

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Gardeners North

Page: 83

Article

Gardeners North

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Better Homes & Gardens October 1938 Magazine Article: Along the Garden Path

Page: 86

Article

Along the Garden Path

NOT long ago I ran across a photograph of a tulip garden in which 52,000 bulbs, flanked by thickets of azaleas and dogwoods, marched to glory. Such an exhibition-- obviously beyond the dreams of average-- couldn't fail to be a knock-out.

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