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47
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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: ACROSS THE Editor's Desk

Page: 3

Article

ACROSS THE Editor's Desk

THE glory of Easter is expressed with age-long solemnity and gorgeous magnificence within cathedrals and churches. But liturgy and ritual aren't the only ceremonials that, at this season, symbolize the hopes of mankind....

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: TATTLE TALES

Page: 4

Article

TATTLE TALES

The Pictures on the Cover: In three glimpses into others' homes this month we hope you'll find many ideas for your own. Ourselves-- we liked the idea, in the white-painted room, of having interesting bits of china and glass as relief to the regularity of bookshelves; and the placement of the desk at right angles.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: EASTER SYMBOL OF PURITY

Page: 7

Article

EASTER SYMBOL OF PURITY

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: THE DIARY of a Plain Dirt Gardener

Pages: 8, 115, 116

Article

THE DIARY of a Plain Dirt Gardener

April 1 Let's see. When was it that I made out my spring seed order? It must have been back in February. But it wasn't until this afternoon, after I had finished with my classwork, that I finally managed to get downtown to get those seeds I want. There's one mighty good reason, tho, for the delay, besides my general laziness. It's financial.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: IT'S NEWS TO ME!

Page: 10

Article

IT'S NEWS TO ME!

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Abrim With Personality

Pages: 15, 104, 105

Article

Abrim With Personality

IF YOU were to ask Architect Herberger how he came to design this home, he'd probably say it was because he went on a motor trip thru the Deep South, and let the matter drop there. But that wouldn't tell you the whole story. You need first to know that he's a southern California architect and that much of the new architecture out there is sparkling and brittle but a little scornful of homespun personality.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Your Rose Questions Answered

Pages: 16, 17, 92, 93

Article

Your Rose Questions Answered

Q Clear up my confusion. How can I tell the various groups of roses apart? A There are five principal types of garden roses-- Tea Roses, Polyantha Roses, Hybrid Perpetuals, Hybrid Teas, and Floribunda Roses.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: CLOSET CLOSE-UPS

Pages: 18, 19

Article

CLOSET CLOSE-UPS

AS EVERY woman knows, a house is no more convenient than its closets. If in building a new house or remodeling an old one you must economize-- and who doesn't?-- don't skimp on closets. If you do, disorder and dismay will forever dog your days as you unwillingly play the despairing game of Pick-up, Put-away, and Look-again.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Miracle of the Marshes

Pages: 20, 21, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91

Article

Miracle of the Marshes

IN THE breast of every Child of Adam who ever thrust spade into unwilling earth has been engendered, at some moment, a feeling of despair.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Color Schemes FOR SPRING

Pages: 22, 23, 24, 25

Article

Color Schemes FOR SPRING

Mrs. J. D. Grove of New York writes: Whatever shall I do with our old-fashioned "front parlor"? It's little and dark, with narrow windows. So please-- a color scheme and other ideas?

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Add a Piece This Spring

Pages: 26, 27

Article

Add a Piece This Spring

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Reflections on Pools

Pages: 28, 29, 114

Article

Reflections on Pools

WHEN the sun shines bright on my old Kentucky home, it really shines bright. And altho the darkies are gay, the borders are not, for too often heat plays false to perennials, annuals, and evergreens.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: APRIL Indoor Gardening Guide

Page: 30

Article

APRIL Indoor Gardening Guide

WITH spring in the air and house-cleaning on the mind, the first warm day tempts us to put our houseplants out-of-doors. But caution! Houseplants, like people, have become tender from being indoors all winter. Unlike us, they can't put on a coat to temper the sudden change.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: APRIL Outdoor Gardening Guide

Page: 31

Article

APRIL Outdoor Gardening Guide

IN APRIL the garden gets down to work in earnest. The soil begins to warm up, and underground plant tissues exert heavy pressure, trying to get up to the light. Listen closely and you'll hear the expansion of shoots and buds as they push thru dead leaves, especially if you're out in a woodland ravine taking lessons and imbibing ambition from the world's head gardener-- Mother Nature.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Gardens on the Shady Side

Pages: 32, 113, 114

Article

Gardens on the Shady Side

DO YOU have a labor-saving lawn-- the kind where you only need to push the mower over two-thirds of it because the other third isn't there, is just bare ground? I did, two years ago.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Come and Get It, West Point!

Pages: 36, 37

Article

Come and Get It, West Point!

WEST POINT! It's a name wreathed around with so much glamour that sometimes we forget the human story behind it-- a story full of fascination for every boy and girl, every mother and father in the country.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Help Her Hurdle the Difficult Ages

Pages: 38, 79, 80, 81

Article

Help Her Hurdle the Difficult Ages

JUST what's back of the gulf that grows so often between a girl and her family, particularly her mother, at the age of puberty? And isn't there some way we can avoid it?

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: The QUESTION Before the House

Pages: 44, 98

Article

The QUESTION Before the House

Decorators are drifting away from painted woodwork to natural finishes or light stains to achieve a particular decorative effect. One advantage is that if the proper finish or stain is chosen, age adds to the attractiveness. Very light effects can be obtained with most woods, and no wood requires a dark finish unless a particularly needed effect requires dark shades.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: IN THE SPIRIT OF Modern Planning

Pages: 46, 76

Article

IN THE SPIRIT OF Modern Planning

MUCH about this house is unique. The exterior is entirely brick. Even corbeled brick overhang is used instead of wood trim to eliminate future painting costs. Exterior trims are limited to chrome-finish railing bars, entrance and stair lamps, garage-door bands, and horizontal aluminum bars on the full-view windows.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Home-Wanters--ATTENTION!

Page: 50

Article

Home-Wanters--ATTENTION!

IF YOU have any plans to build, buy, or remodel a home with FHA financing, this is important!

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: MUSIC, on the Up!

Page: 50

Article

MUSIC, on the Up!

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Living-Room Gossip

Pages: 54, 74

Article

Living-Room Gossip

IT WAS past mid-afternoon in late spring. No one was at home and a hush had fallen over the house after the confusion of a busy morning. A vibrant freshness over all gave evidence of general housecleaning, and that not an article had escaped the vigilance of the mistress was apparent from gleaming brass, the mellowed sheen of old woods, and the clearness of fine glass.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Iris Bloom the Year Around

Pages: 56, 110, 111, 112

Article

Iris Bloom the Year Around

TULIPS will come, but tulips must go. Hollyhocks and delphinium also have their brief seasons of bloom. So do most of our favorites-- that is, all but the iris.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Handy House

Page: 58

Article

Handy House

LOOK closely at the floor plans, gentlemen, and you'll see how a home like this helps you to keep out of the doghouse. You see a house designed so that it's almost as easy to put things where they belong as to push them under the bed or leave them on top of the refrigerator in the kitchen.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Lady, Spare That Rug!

Pages: 61, 96

Article

Lady, Spare That Rug!

RUGS, no matter how sturdily made or highly pedigreed, certainly do have a tough time keeping beautiful. And so would you, if every day of your life you had grit ground into you, food spilled upon you, furniture poking you persistently, and feet endlessly marching over your top-side.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: QUIZ

Pages: 62, 77

Article

QUIZ

HERE'S a mixed quiz about dogs --some true-and-false, some selective questions-- so that it will be fair to the disciples of both types of quiz. Check-mark your choices, then turn to page 77 to see how much you really know about dogs and dog care. Score 10 for each correct answer.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Ask Me Another!

Pages: 64, 84

Article

Ask Me Another!

Q Under two of my windows are radiators. Is it all right to hang long draperies at the other windows and short ones at these?

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: The Wedding March on Nature's Trails

Pages: 66, 75, 76

Article

The Wedding March on Nature's Trails

IN THE springtime, wild-folk fancies lightly turn to thoughts of love-- altho the other seasons, too, have their share of bridal couples.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: THE MAN NEXT DOOR

Pages: 68, 69

Article

THE MAN NEXT DOOR

Well, here comes April, that deceptive something in the air which makes a man think he can jump a four-foot fence, to impress the wife, only to end up vaulting it awkwardly.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Kitchen Curtains

Pages: 70, 71, 96, 97

Article

Kitchen Curtains

APRIL sunshine and blithe new curtains at the kitchen windows art perfect running mates! And this year --make your own. They're fun, and worlds more individual. Here art eight of our favorites-- schemed for kitchen or breakfast-room windows, but many of them just as clever for bedrooms and sunrooms.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: DAD'S Practical Pointers

Page: 73

Article

DAD'S Practical Pointers

One method of temporarily fixing damaged spots in the linoleum you are not quite ready to throw away: Sand out the hole, then fill with melted sealing wax of the right color. Smooth off with a table knife before it hardens.--

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Four Little, Five Little Neighbors

Page: 74

Article

Four Little, Five Little Neighbors

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: POPPIES MAKE THE DESERT BLOOM

Page: 78

Article

POPPIES MAKE THE DESERT BLOOM

WE THINK of the desert land in Arizona as a barren expanse: dry, hot, colorless. And so it is, in places.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: We Live Outdoors and Love It

Pages: 82, 83

Article

We Live Outdoors and Love It

IN MAY we wake in our gardenhouse to bird songs and to the fragrance of apple blossoms almost by our bed; and late in the fall we linger there, with the shutters drawn and a thick steak sizzling over red coals. We eat, sleep, and play in this gardenhouse that we ourselves built only a few steps from our own kitchen door.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Burning Bush

Page: 85

Article

Burning Bush

YOU may call it fraxinella, dittany, or some other name handed down from Grandmother's time. But most people still refer to Dictamnus albus as the gasplant, or burningbush. Around these last two names has centered much friendly controversy. Does the plant actually give off gas? And does this gas burn?

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 89

Article

Article

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: All Pulled Up

Pages: 94, 95

Article

All Pulled Up

AND no wonder! If you'd consumed the eggs this month's prizewinners can boast, you'd puff too-- and probably pop! For running mates in the Cooks' Contest announced last October are Angel and Sponge Cakes and Spring Lamb Dishes.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Whims & Hobbies

Page: 99

Article

Whims & Hobbies

The city of Orlando, Florida, has a hobby. It's waterfowl. Besides swans, ducks, and herons, which are permanent residents, hundreds of wild duck and seagull winter guests are fed daily. At 4 p. m. the park policeman blows on his whistle a shrill blast which brings the ducks scrambling for corn.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Here's an Idea!

Pages: 100, 106

Article

Here's an Idea!

GORGEOUS things, these slick modern bathrooms, but you can't always turn an old gray mare into a fast-stepping filly just by wishing. It's all very well to read about roomy bathrooms, glamorous with glowing colors, glittering mirrors,7 and modern fixtures.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Forsythias SPROUT SUDDEN BEAUTY

Pages: 103, 112, 113

Article

Forsythias SPROUT SUDDEN BEAUTY

WHAT more definitely proclaims the end of flowerless winter than the quickened, sudden beauty of the flowering forsythias, or goldenbells?

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Victoria

Page: 104

Article

Victoria

THE victoria, or Royal Waterlily, has the largest leaf of all waterlilies in the world. It's a South American aquatic which has captured our imagination by its remarkable performance. Its huge, round, floating leaves have been known to bear a weight of 150 to 200 pounds.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Names of Materials

Page: 106

Article

Names of Materials

Co-operating With Better Homes & Gardens: Following are manufacturers' names of materials shown on pages 23 and 24. These materials are available at department and furniture stores across the country.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Insurance Trust?

Page: 107

Article

Insurance Trust?

A PHYSICIAN I know has never made a will; never expects to. "Why should I?" he asks. "Every financial contingency I've ever wanted to anticipate could be met perfectly with different kinds of insurance and settlement provisions. An insurance contract is a will as well as insurance." True enough!

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Where Should I Plant That Tree?

Pages: 108, 109, 110

Article

Where Should I Plant That Tree?

NOBODY pays much attention to a little brook winding thru a treeless meadow; it's just another drainage ditch. But send this brook meandering down thru some trees, let them intertwine their branches above it, and shoot piercing shafts of sunlight into shaded pools where creamy cows stand switching flies and cooling their hot bulk, and hundreds come to stand in mute wonderment at the beauty they see.

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 113

Article

Article

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 113

Article

Article

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Better Homes & Gardens April 1939 Magazine Article: Along the Garden Path

Page: 118

Article

Along the Garden Path

POWDERED ZINC OXIDE dusted lightly on the surface of the soil helps prevent damping-off of columbines and other pesky seedbed actors. But it's definitely harmful to zinnias, ageratum, chrysanthemums, and gaillardias.-- Lulu Egan Quinlan, Okla.

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