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80
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Articles:
32
Recipes:
4
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68
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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: ACROSS THE Editor's Desk

Page: 4

Article

ACROSS THE Editor's Desk

HOME from school every day come the children, some of them loaded down like young lawyers with brief cases and bags bulging with homework for tomorrow's lessons.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: THE DIARY of a Plain Dirt Gardener

Pages: 8, 80, 81

Article

THE DIARY of a Plain Dirt Gardener

What a day! What a day! First, I went out to the vegetable garden and gathered ten ripe cantaloupes, which I hauled to the back door in the wheelbarrow, to Maggie's dismay, for we haven't begun to eat what I brought in the past two days.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: IT'S news TO ME!

Page: 10

Article

IT'S news TO ME!

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Don't Be So Kind To Your Burglar!

Pages: 13, 68, 69, 75, 76

Article

Don't Be So Kind To Your Burglar!

EVERYONE dreads a burglar. He has an uncanny knack of twisting keys and no end of nerve-- he may walk right in while you are listening to the radio. Sneak thieves take things while you are talking to them. Prowlers can be ugly customers.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Modern Is Adaptable

Pages: 14, 15, 50

Article

Modern Is Adaptable

HAVEN'T you often thought of yourself as a modern person in most respects, except for your inability to picture yourself living in a room decorated in the Modern manner? Haven't you felt, as you looked at Modern rooms, that tradition has been so far thrown overboard that there's nothing left of those essential qualities, charm and hominess, which spell the difference between your own living-room, no matter how simple, and the lobby of a hotel, no matter how elegant? Of course, many of us have accepted, even welcomed, modern developments in various other phases of our lives.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Give Your Home the Air

Pages: 16, 17

Article

Give Your Home the Air

TWENTY-FIVE years ago a craze for California Bungalows came out of the West like news of a gold strike. It hopped the Rockies, hit with a vengeance in the Middlewest. Up went sprawling bungalow foundations that gulped load after load of tile. Up went roofs too low-pitched to carry off the Middlewest's heavy snow and rain

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: of Course You Can Grow Sweet Peas

Pages: 18, 19, 86

Article

of Course You Can Grow Sweet Peas

DO YOU know anyone who still grows Sweet Peas, the same lovely fragrant flowers that filled Grandmother's garden with such heavenly perfume? Chances are you haven't seen good Sweet Peas in the garden for years. People all wail that Sweet Peas have "run out," that modern varieties are "no Rood."

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Vanity SWEET Vanity

Pages: 20, 21

Article

Vanity SWEET Vanity

The Polka Gay, practical, and peasanty, its full skirt created from alternating stripes of white and lilac linen falling from a lilac band, its seams banded with coral rickrack. The standing mirror on the mirror table top is crystal with tiny crystal rosettes, while the lamps start with brass candlesticks, rise to wee oil pots of coral and white spiraled glass, topped by white parchment paper shades bright with coral rickrack.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: See How to Get a Better Home

Pages: 22, 23

Article

See How to Get a Better Home

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: SEPTEMBER Indoor GARDENING GUIDE

Page: 24

Article

SEPTEMBER Indoor GARDENING GUIDE

HERE'S something that's easy, fun, and excitingly new-- cutting some of your flowers now and drying them in sand for fresh winter bouquets. Imagine what that means. Bouquets of your own flowers, grown in your own summer garden, for Thanksgiving and Christmas and those bright winter afternoon parties; bouquets that keep their color and summery crispness for weeks, even when your fireplace is roaring.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: SEPTEMBER Outdoor GARDENING GUIDE

Page: 25

Article

SEPTEMBER Outdoor GARDENING GUIDE

COOLING rains and shortening days start new growth in September. Annuals burst out in all their glory. Perennials send up new shoots and dig their roots in deeper. Woody plants, too, are making ready for their no-decision bout with winter.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: FLOOR-ICULTURE

Pages: 26, 64, 65

Article

FLOOR-ICULTURE

IF YOU'RE thinking this fall about new carpets and rugs for your home, ten to one you belong to one of the following classifications of humanity:

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Color-IS THE THEME

Pages: 27, 72, 73

Article

Color-IS THE THEME

COMBINE A KEEN enthusiasm, a nose for news, a down-to-earth appreciation of women's needs, and a fine working knowledge of the field of home-decorating-- and you have a candid-camera shot of Florence B. Terhune, author, lecturer, charming person.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article:

Pages: 28, 40, 86, 87

Article

"Pot-of-Gold" House

WE'RE tempted to use a lot of superlatives about this month's Bildcost Gardened Home. For, to us, it's a rare find. We're quite elated about it. And if you're a longtime seeker for a small house that'll take care of a good-sized family, and yet one that can be built without pocketbook strain, we think you'll be elated, too.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: More Four-legged Families

Pages: 34, 66, 67

Article

More Four-legged Families

AMERICA'S Enemy No. 1 today is child unemployment. This startling conclusion comes from one of the country's foremost authorities on family life, Dr. Paul Popenoe, head of the Institute of Family Relations, of Los Angeles, the only organization in the world devoted solely to the problems of the home.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: They're Prize Concoctions

Page: 39

Article

They're Prize Concoctions

AND tops among the prize-takers, in our Cooks' Contest for Salad Dressings, and Rice Main Dishes announced last March, we give you delectable and fluffy Pineapple-Cheese Dressing, masterpiece of Miss Elsie E. McMurray, of Avalon, Pennsylvania.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Accessories That Go to College

Pages: 42, 43

Article

Accessories That Go to College

LET'S get right to the point by assuming that you're a first-year college girl-- or will be that exciting person in a few speedy weeks-- and that you're completely in a fog about what to take along to feather your dormitory nest-to-be.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Ask Me Another!

Pages: 49, 50

Article

Ask Me Another!

Q Recently I inherited a really fine portrait framed in a carved gold-leaf frame. I want to hang it over the fireplace, but that wall is of ordinary plastered brick. How shall I hang it so it will look right?

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Tourists Taken ...

Pages: 52, 53, 62

Article

Tourists Taken ...

THE vagabond fever used to be seasonal, but now it's epidemic the year around. We haven't started taking in each other's washings. We just take each other in, at a dollar a head.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Patch That Basement Wall

Pages: 54, 55

Article

Patch That Basement Wall

A LEAKY basement wall is no disgrace, but often needless. Basements of even very good houses may become porous, especially with age, but the remedies are simple and inexpensive. They're also exacting; if wrongly used, failure is certain.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: How to ... an Old House

Pages: 56, 57, 84

Article

How to ... an Old House

IT'S a foregone conclusion that a few architects, contractors, and home-owners served KP duty in the army. Or else, in their short-pants days, they used to help Mother peel potatoes. Their work indicates a background of expert familiarity with a paring knife.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Autumn-Crocus IT'S TRULY MAGICAL

Pages: 58, 59

Article

Autumn-Crocus IT'S TRULY MAGICAL

IF YOU read the advertisements, you will find that autumn-crocus require no soil, no water, and no care. Of course, you'll take this statement with a grain of caution, but it's true that they're quite magical. They'll bloom as soon as late summer arrives, without soil or water.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Royal Show-Off These Lilies

Pages: 60, 61

Article

Royal Show-Off These Lilies

WHEN fall shows up on the horizon, and you can go out almost any evening after supper and smell it in the air, that's the time to plant lilies.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: West Windows

Page: 63

Article

West Windows

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Genuine DENTONS

Page: 66

Article

Genuine DENTONS

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 68

Article

Article

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: There's a Hedge for Every Purpose

Pages: 70, 71, 84, 85

Article

There's a Hedge for Every Purpose

HEDGES are the home-owners' window dressings. They're the final touch that sets off a place-- the hallmark of the family that wants a more attractive home and garden.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: TATTLE TALES

Page: 74

Article

TATTLE TALES

Among Our Guests: Back in 1915, Frank W. Brock ("Don't Be So Kind to Your Burglar," page 13) was engaged by the New York Tribune Bureau of Investigation to assist Samuel Hopkins Adams in getting up some feature stories exposing business frauds.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: The Man Next Door

Pages: 76, 77

Article

The Man Next Door

In our block the two champion vacationists seem to be the lawyer on the corner, who claims he drove more mileage in this summer's holiday than anyone else in the neighborhood, and the doctor across the street, who boasts that he spent more hours in bed and out in the sunshine.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: The Room That ... From a Picture

Pages: 78, 79, 83

Article

The Room That ... From a Picture

YOU'VE heard the old one about the man who assembled his car around a crank? Well, this is its modern counterpart-- the story of a living-room-of-today built around the colors in a lovely picture.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Tax-Dodging That's Legal

Page: 82

Article

Tax-Dodging That's Legal

POSSIBLY you were one of the millions of men and women who eagerly followed the daily column "New York Day by Day" in your favorite newspaper, written by the lovable O. O. McIntyre who died in 1937.

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Better Homes & Gardens September 1939 Magazine Article: Along the Garden Path

Page: 88

Article

Along the Garden Path

DID YOU KNOW that rose canes can be protected for the winter by laying them on the grass walk? Remove some of the soil on the side of the plant toward the path, bend the canes down and secure them with stakes as shown in the sketch, then mound with soil.

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