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Pages in Issue:
72
Original Cost:
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Dimensions:
9.125w X 12.5h
Articles:
25
Recipes:
3
Advertisements:
64
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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Distinguished Service ON THE Home Front

Page: 7

Article

Distinguished Service ON THE Home Front

ONE outstanding custom of war is the recognition and reward of military virtue. The successful commander is not the one who is always threatening court-martial; the leader men will follow to death is the man who recognizes and emphasizes achievement-- who expects to see in his men courage and fidelity, not cowardice and self-seeking. Those foul things will crawl to their holes without much attention.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Let's Choose Sides and Fight About Furniture

Pages: 8, 9

Article

Let's Choose Sides and Fight About Furniture

I have one of those feminine minds that likes to be cluttered with familiar things. I dislike empty buildings, silent, thick-padded rooms with carpet of one color running from room to room. It would be like living in a hotel room far from home.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: LATE TIPS ON Wartime Living

Page: 10

Article

LATE TIPS ON Wartime Living

Garden peas ready for eating should be picked in early morning, then kept unshelled in a cold place until cooking time. They mature rapidly in the heat of day and as they mature, grow less sweet and more starchy. String beans, on the other hand, shouldn't be gathered when the plant is wet with dew or rain-- this tends to spread bean rust.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article:

Pages: 12, 59, 60

Article

"We Regret to Inform You"

THE letter on my desk is one of the most poignant I have ever received, in spite of its restraint. Perhaps it is the more poignant because of its restraint.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Should You Have Another Baby?

Pages: 15, 42, 54, 55

Article

Should You Have Another Baby?

THERE was one way in which the Smiths were different from the other "young marrieds" of World War I. They didn't seem to know when-- or maybe it was how-- to stop having babies.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Design for Open Living

Pages: 16, 17

Article

Design for Open Living

HERE is how a house grew. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Watts owned a hillside lot on Twin Peaks, San Francisco.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Fences Can Be Friendly

Pages: 18, 19

Article

Fences Can Be Friendly

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Select your home site

Pages: 20, 21, 64

Article

Select your home site

A YOUNG couple settled down to begin married life on a plot of ground overlooking a river valley and mile on mile of beauty. Within three months they were peeking at their view thru slats. Nosey neighbors had forced them to retire behind Venetian blinds 24 hours a day for even a shred of privacy.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Daylilies and Phlox

Pages: 22, 23

Article

Daylilies and Phlox

DAYLILIES and phlox are just the thing for long, lazy summer days when even the most energetic gardener likes to look off across the lawn at good masses of color without having to do something about it every little while.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: They Decorated Their Home with needle and thread

Pages: 24, 25

Article

They Decorated Their Home with needle and thread

"WHEN I turn decorator in my own home, my tools are my needle and thread and my sewing machine." That was Mrs. Watson Green speaking. She was showing me thru her pretty home in Kansas City, Missouri, which she has "whipped together" with her busy needle and the enthusiastic help of Peggy Sloan, whose genius for color inspired the friendly relationship between rooms.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: THIS Spore Dust WILL SAVE YOUR LAWN

Pages: 26, 27

Article

THIS Spore Dust WILL SAVE YOUR LAWN

AGAINST one enemy Americans need have no scruples in waging bacterial warfare. This is the Japanese Beetle, scourge of many urban and suburban gardeners.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Keep the Home Place Trim

Pages: 26, 27

Article

Keep the Home Place Trim

WITHOUT any help it's quite a job, this keeping the home place up. What can you do to control shrubbery? The hedge? Do the junipers beside the door have to be clipped? Will the lawn get full of weeds if you let it grow the rest of the summer?

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Push Your House Aside

Pages: 28, 29

Article

Push Your House Aside

THERE'S one building regulation common to all well-planned cities and towns that's a headache to architects and home-owners alike. It's the setback regulation, demanding that every house must rest no closer to the street than a certain arbitrary line.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Color brought lift to this drab house

Pages: 30, 31

Article

Color brought lift to this drab house

IF THERE is such a thing as a house for rent in Washington, D. C., we Browns never got close enough to see it. The mobs of the house-hungry were just too thick.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: A Home Ideas Built

Page: 32

Article

A Home Ideas Built

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: KNOW THE ART OF Perfect Fried Chicken?

Page: 38

Article

KNOW THE ART OF Perfect Fried Chicken?

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Easy Canning Short-Cuts

Pages: 39, 49

Article

Easy Canning Short-Cuts

I LIKE to can. But I don't can the way I once did. System, I used to say, doesn't fit my personality. I belonged to the self-expression school. But not any more. The old what'll-I-do-next business is out. System, orderliness, motion-saving are as much a necessity in a wartime canning attack as in a bomber assembly line. The nicest thing about a really streamlined canning system is that it attracts helpers.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Young Mothers' Exchange

Pages: 40, 41

Article

Young Mothers' Exchange

ONE of the nicest things about the Young Mothers' Exchange is its human-interest side. In the first place, of course, babies themselves are the most humanizing things there are. And besides that, so many lovely stories come along with the very practical suggestions you send.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Canning Tricks--By You

Page: 49

Article

Canning Tricks--By You

My dish drainer has a steady job all thru canning season. After washing apples or pears, or scalding tomatoes and peaches, I place them in the rack. It is big, doesn't bruise them, drains them quickly. It's a good jar carrier, too.-- Mrs. Philip E. Brown, Norwalk, Ohio.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: THE DIARY of a Plain Dirt Gardener

Pages: 50, 61, 62, 63

Article

THE DIARY of a Plain Dirt Gardener

Aug. 1 When Maggie came back home from church this morning, she found me out weeding my fall vegetable rows and politely informed me that it is wicked to work on Sunday. She has been telling me that for 20 years now.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Tomato Aspic Ring Captures Cooks' Prize

Pages: 52, 53

Article

Tomato Aspic Ring Captures Cooks' Prize

HERE'S a cool aspic ring that tops them all! Gather up those garden tomatoes and jump on our judges' chuck wagon. The judges unanimously voted Summertime Tomato Aspic way in the lead as dish of the month. It was sent in by Justine G. Eberhardt of Dubuque, Iowa. She receives a $10 prize in our Cooks' Contest for Tomatoes Free Style and Jams and Jellies, announced last January.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: August Outdoor Gardening Guide

Pages: 56, 58

Article

August Outdoor Gardening Guide

THE bright sunlit days of August aid plants in their manufacture of plant sugars. These sugars in turn are stored in seeds, roots, and stems. Vegetables are hastened to their maturity. It behooves the alert gardener to keep on his toes lest he let the prime condition of his harvest go by.

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Article

Page: 63

Article

Article

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: Table Glamour From Your Garden

Page: 66

Article

Table Glamour From Your Garden

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Better Homes & Gardens August 1944 Magazine Article: The Man Next Door

Pages: 68, 69, 71

Article

The Man Next Door

Since I've been overseas I've noticed that some of our toughest, most pugnacious generals are also among our most regular churchgoers. (Some of them even look like crusaders in overseas caps.)

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